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Title: A Novel Heating Technology for Ultra-High Resolution Imaging in Electron Microscopes

Abstract

Capabilities for in-situ studies of materials at elevated temperatures and under gaseous environments have received increasing attention in recent years [1]. With the advent of electron microscopes that provide routine imaging at the atomic level (e.g. aberration-corrected TEM and STEM instruments), it is of particular interest to be able to record images at high temperatures while retaining the inherent resolution of the microscope; that is, the resolution is not limited by drift in the heating holder or other instabilities associated with its operation. Furthermore, there are a number of commercial and experimental heating devices that have been used over the years; some holders are designed with miniature furnaces that heat entire grids [2], while a more recent development used a tiny spiral filament coated with a carbon film as the heater element [3]. These devices, while very useful for some applications (particularly in environmental microscopes that employ differential pumping to allow gases at some elevated pressure to be injected around the specimen), are invariably not as stable as might be desired for sub- Angstrom imaging experiments. The speed at which the sample can be heated to temperature for stable operation also limits them. In collaboration with Protochips Inc. (Raleigh, NC),more » our laboratory is developing a novel new technology for in-situ heating experiments that overcomes a number of performance problems associated with standard heating stage technologies [4].« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology
  2. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  3. UOP LLC., Des Plaines, IL (United States)
  4. Univ. of Missouri, St. Louis, MO (United States). Center for Nanoscience and Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1364251
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Microscopy Today
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 04; Journal ID: ISSN 1551-9295
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; in-situ; electron microscopy; high-resolution; heating; MEMS; novel technology

Citation Formats

Allard, Lawrence F., Bigelow, Wilbur C., Bradley, Steven A., and Liu, Jingyue. A Novel Heating Technology for Ultra-High Resolution Imaging in Electron Microscopes. United States: N. p., 2009. Web. doi:10.1017/S1551929509000030.
Allard, Lawrence F., Bigelow, Wilbur C., Bradley, Steven A., & Liu, Jingyue. A Novel Heating Technology for Ultra-High Resolution Imaging in Electron Microscopes. United States. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1551929509000030
Allard, Lawrence F., Bigelow, Wilbur C., Bradley, Steven A., and Liu, Jingyue. 2009. "A Novel Heating Technology for Ultra-High Resolution Imaging in Electron Microscopes". United States. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1551929509000030.
@article{osti_1364251,
title = {A Novel Heating Technology for Ultra-High Resolution Imaging in Electron Microscopes},
author = {Allard, Lawrence F. and Bigelow, Wilbur C. and Bradley, Steven A. and Liu, Jingyue},
abstractNote = {Capabilities for in-situ studies of materials at elevated temperatures and under gaseous environments have received increasing attention in recent years [1]. With the advent of electron microscopes that provide routine imaging at the atomic level (e.g. aberration-corrected TEM and STEM instruments), it is of particular interest to be able to record images at high temperatures while retaining the inherent resolution of the microscope; that is, the resolution is not limited by drift in the heating holder or other instabilities associated with its operation. Furthermore, there are a number of commercial and experimental heating devices that have been used over the years; some holders are designed with miniature furnaces that heat entire grids [2], while a more recent development used a tiny spiral filament coated with a carbon film as the heater element [3]. These devices, while very useful for some applications (particularly in environmental microscopes that employ differential pumping to allow gases at some elevated pressure to be injected around the specimen), are invariably not as stable as might be desired for sub- Angstrom imaging experiments. The speed at which the sample can be heated to temperature for stable operation also limits them. In collaboration with Protochips Inc. (Raleigh, NC), our laboratory is developing a novel new technology for in-situ heating experiments that overcomes a number of performance problems associated with standard heating stage technologies [4].},
doi = {10.1017/S1551929509000030},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1364251}, journal = {Microscopy Today},
issn = {1551-9295},
number = 04,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {2009},
month = {6}
}