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Title: Evaluation of Corrosion on Materials at the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex using Hand-Held Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

Abstract

Evaluation of Corrosion on Materials at the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex using Hand-Held Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1364105
Report Number(s):
MS-GAR-170526
DOE Contract Number:
DE-NA0001942
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 9th Euro-Mediterranean Symposium on LIBS / Pisa, Italy / June 11-16, 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Corrosion, uranium alloys, LIBS, copper alloy, uranium metal, uranium hydride, uranium oxides

Citation Formats

Garlea, Elena, Bennett, Brittany, and Martin, Madhavi Z. Evaluation of Corrosion on Materials at the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex using Hand-Held Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Garlea, Elena, Bennett, Brittany, & Martin, Madhavi Z. Evaluation of Corrosion on Materials at the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex using Hand-Held Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy. United States.
Garlea, Elena, Bennett, Brittany, and Martin, Madhavi Z. Sun . "Evaluation of Corrosion on Materials at the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex using Hand-Held Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364105.
@article{osti_1364105,
title = {Evaluation of Corrosion on Materials at the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex using Hand-Held Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy},
author = {Garlea, Elena and Bennett, Brittany and Martin, Madhavi Z.},
abstractNote = {Evaluation of Corrosion on Materials at the Y-12 Nuclear Security Complex using Hand-Held Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jun 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun Jun 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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