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Title: Aligning PEV Charging Times with Electricity Supply and Demand

Abstract

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are a growing source of electricity consumption that could either exacerbate supply shortages or smooth electricity demand curves. Extensive research has explored how vehicle-grid integration (VGI) can be optimized by controlling PEV charging timing or providing vehicle-to-grid (V2G) services, such as storing energy in vehicle batteries and returning it to the grid at peak times. While much of this research has modeled charging, implementation in the real world requires a cost-effective solution that accounts for consumer behavior. To function across different contexts, several types of charging administrators and methods of control are necessary to minimize costs in the VGI context.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1364027
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5400-68623
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; U.S. Department of Energy; DOE; Office of International Affairs; Clean Energy Ministerial; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; NREL; plug-in electric vehicle; PEV; PEV charging; vehicle-grid integration; VGI; vehicle-to-grid; V2G; electricity supply and demand

Citation Formats

Hodge, Cabell. Aligning PEV Charging Times with Electricity Supply and Demand. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1364027.
Hodge, Cabell. Aligning PEV Charging Times with Electricity Supply and Demand. United States. doi:10.2172/1364027.
Hodge, Cabell. 2017. "Aligning PEV Charging Times with Electricity Supply and Demand". United States. doi:10.2172/1364027. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364027.
@article{osti_1364027,
title = {Aligning PEV Charging Times with Electricity Supply and Demand},
author = {Hodge, Cabell},
abstractNote = {Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are a growing source of electricity consumption that could either exacerbate supply shortages or smooth electricity demand curves. Extensive research has explored how vehicle-grid integration (VGI) can be optimized by controlling PEV charging timing or providing vehicle-to-grid (V2G) services, such as storing energy in vehicle batteries and returning it to the grid at peak times. While much of this research has modeled charging, implementation in the real world requires a cost-effective solution that accounts for consumer behavior. To function across different contexts, several types of charging administrators and methods of control are necessary to minimize costs in the VGI context.},
doi = {10.2172/1364027},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

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