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Title: The Fueling Power of Plants

Abstract

Chief Chemist Rich Hallen is fueling our nation’s ability to be less dependent on imported oil. He imagines ways to use plants and other biological organisms as cost-effective and clean alternatives for crude oil for aviation fuel, gasoline or diesel. It’s a concept that has been around as long as cars have been on the road. Henry Ford’s first car could run on peanut oil. Today, Rich’s team is doing research that is sprouting new interest in the growing need for biofuels.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1363932
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; PETROLEUM DERIVED PRODUCTS; MICROORGANISMS; ENZYMES

Citation Formats

Hallen, Rich. The Fueling Power of Plants. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Hallen, Rich. The Fueling Power of Plants. United States.
Hallen, Rich. Mon . "The Fueling Power of Plants". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363932.
@article{osti_1363932,
title = {The Fueling Power of Plants},
author = {Hallen, Rich},
abstractNote = {Chief Chemist Rich Hallen is fueling our nation’s ability to be less dependent on imported oil. He imagines ways to use plants and other biological organisms as cost-effective and clean alternatives for crude oil for aviation fuel, gasoline or diesel. It’s a concept that has been around as long as cars have been on the road. Henry Ford’s first car could run on peanut oil. Today, Rich’s team is doing research that is sprouting new interest in the growing need for biofuels.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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