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Title: Proteomics: Determining Impacts on Health From Energy, Environment

Abstract

Meet PNNL Cancer Biologist Karin Rodland. Karin sees a day when people no longer die from cancer. On this day, we will have the ability to detect the deadly disease early, well before tumors metastasize and spread. When masses are detected while still small and localized, they can be completely surgically removed. Karin is leveraging PNNL’s capabilities in analytical chemistry and proteomics—or the study of proteins, their structures and functions—in a search for cancer biomarkers that may reveal cancer at its earliest stages. PNNL researchers conduct studies and experiments to understand biological systems to advance DOE’s energy and environment missions. Our research contributes to bioenergy and bioremediation, as well as enabling the early detection of disease and improving therapies.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1363927
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CANCER BIOLOGY; TREATMENT; AGGRESSIVE DISEASE; OVERTREATMENT; BIOMARKERS

Citation Formats

Rodland, Karin. Proteomics: Determining Impacts on Health From Energy, Environment. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Rodland, Karin. Proteomics: Determining Impacts on Health From Energy, Environment. United States.
Rodland, Karin. 2017. "Proteomics: Determining Impacts on Health From Energy, Environment". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363927.
@article{osti_1363927,
title = {Proteomics: Determining Impacts on Health From Energy, Environment},
author = {Rodland, Karin},
abstractNote = {Meet PNNL Cancer Biologist Karin Rodland. Karin sees a day when people no longer die from cancer. On this day, we will have the ability to detect the deadly disease early, well before tumors metastasize and spread. When masses are detected while still small and localized, they can be completely surgically removed. Karin is leveraging PNNL’s capabilities in analytical chemistry and proteomics—or the study of proteins, their structures and functions—in a search for cancer biomarkers that may reveal cancer at its earliest stages. PNNL researchers conduct studies and experiments to understand biological systems to advance DOE’s energy and environment missions. Our research contributes to bioenergy and bioremediation, as well as enabling the early detection of disease and improving therapies.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}
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