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Title: Big Data, Big Solutions

Abstract

Data—lots of data—generated in seconds and piling up on the internet, streaming and stored in countless databases. Big data is important for commerce, society and our nation’s security. Yet the volume, velocity, variety and veracity of data is simply too great for any single analyst to make sense of alone. It requires advanced, data-intensive computing. Simply put, data-intensive computing is the use of sophisticated computers to sort through mounds of information and present analysts with solutions in the form of graphics, scenarios, formulas, new hypotheses and more. This scientific capability is foundational to PNNL’s energy, environment and security missions. Senior Scientist and Division Director Bill Pike and his team are developing analytic tools that are used to solve important national challenges, including cyber systems defense, power grid control systems, intelligence analysis, climate change and scientific exploration.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1363922
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; DATA; DATA INTENSIVE WORLD; COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Pike, Bill. Big Data, Big Solutions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Pike, Bill. Big Data, Big Solutions. United States.
Pike, Bill. Mon . "Big Data, Big Solutions". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363922.
@article{osti_1363922,
title = {Big Data, Big Solutions},
author = {Pike, Bill},
abstractNote = {Data—lots of data—generated in seconds and piling up on the internet, streaming and stored in countless databases. Big data is important for commerce, society and our nation’s security. Yet the volume, velocity, variety and veracity of data is simply too great for any single analyst to make sense of alone. It requires advanced, data-intensive computing. Simply put, data-intensive computing is the use of sophisticated computers to sort through mounds of information and present analysts with solutions in the form of graphics, scenarios, formulas, new hypotheses and more. This scientific capability is foundational to PNNL’s energy, environment and security missions. Senior Scientist and Division Director Bill Pike and his team are developing analytic tools that are used to solve important national challenges, including cyber systems defense, power grid control systems, intelligence analysis, climate change and scientific exploration.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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