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Title: Market-Based and System-Wide Fuel Cycle Optimization

Abstract

This work introduces automated optimization into fuel cycle simulations in the Cyclus platform. This includes system-level optimizations, seeking a deployment plan that optimizes the performance over the entire transition, and market-level optimization, seeking an optimal set of material trades at each time step. These concepts were introduced in a way that preserves the flexibility of the Cyclus fuel cycle framework, one of its most important design principles.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
  2. Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1363866
Report Number(s):
DOE-UW-0000673
TRN: US1702292
DOE Contract Number:
NE0000673
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; FUEL CYCLE; OPTIMIZATION; FUELS; MARKET; TRADE; nuclear fuel cycles; optimization; agent-based simulation

Citation Formats

Wilson, Paul Philip Hood, Scopatz, Anthony, Gidden, Matthew, Carlsen, Robert, Mouginot, Baptiste, and Flanagan, Robert. Market-Based and System-Wide Fuel Cycle Optimization. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1363866.
Wilson, Paul Philip Hood, Scopatz, Anthony, Gidden, Matthew, Carlsen, Robert, Mouginot, Baptiste, & Flanagan, Robert. Market-Based and System-Wide Fuel Cycle Optimization. United States. doi:10.2172/1363866.
Wilson, Paul Philip Hood, Scopatz, Anthony, Gidden, Matthew, Carlsen, Robert, Mouginot, Baptiste, and Flanagan, Robert. Tue . "Market-Based and System-Wide Fuel Cycle Optimization". United States. doi:10.2172/1363866. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363866.
@article{osti_1363866,
title = {Market-Based and System-Wide Fuel Cycle Optimization},
author = {Wilson, Paul Philip Hood and Scopatz, Anthony and Gidden, Matthew and Carlsen, Robert and Mouginot, Baptiste and Flanagan, Robert},
abstractNote = {This work introduces automated optimization into fuel cycle simulations in the Cyclus platform. This includes system-level optimizations, seeking a deployment plan that optimizes the performance over the entire transition, and market-level optimization, seeking an optimal set of material trades at each time step. These concepts were introduced in a way that preserves the flexibility of the Cyclus fuel cycle framework, one of its most important design principles.},
doi = {10.2172/1363866},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jun 13 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Jun 13 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Dynamic Resource Exchange (DRE) gives agency to consumer facilities to determine the preference of any particular trade that is offered by suppliers to satisfy its requests. This provides a natural balance of power in the relationship between consumers and suppliers. However, in situations in which suppliers have flexibility surrounding the way that they respond to individual requests, they have no mechanism to assess how different bids will be received by the consumer. Theoretically, a supplier can offer multiple bids to respond to a given request in an attempt to “cover their bases”, but this introduces more arcs into themore » underlying network flow problem, increasing the cost to solve the problem. In the extreme, when a supplier can continuously vary the characteristics of the bid, this can represent a large number of additional arcs and have real performance consequences. To remedy this inefficiency in the implementation of the market-level optimization, the definition of a request has been extended to include a function that can be used by the supplier to query the preference that would be assigned by a consumer for a potential bid. The supplier is then free to implement arbitrarily complex algorithms to revise/optimize its bid based on responses to this function. A supplier can chose to not invoke the function at all, mimicking the original DRE behavior, can use it to select among a small set of discrete choices, or can implement an internal algorithm to seek an optimum bid on a continuous parameter space. This capability was demonstrated with a storage facility that preferred material with a specific decay heat that was as close as possible to the maximum allowable decay heat, while requiring the specific decay heat to fall between a minimum and maximum level. This archetype was used to fill multiple storage roles in a simulation that also included a standard recipe reactor: wet storage with no maximum allowable specific decay heat, dry storage with a modest maximum allowable specific decay heat, and a geologic repository with a low maximum allowable specific decay heat. In such a simulation, the reactor, wet storage and dry storage always offer their material to be taken by one of the other storage facilities. The preference function of the consumer would always ensure that material only flowed when the decay heat was sufficiently low, but in the absence of objective function callbacks, would allow for many superfluous offers that exceeded those limits. If this archetype also uses a callback function to probe the preference of the receiving facility for each possible offer, it can avoid making offers that are not going to be accepted by the receiving facility.« less
  • Modifications of Cat-d and d-t fuel cycles are investigated. The Cat-d cycle is modified by adjusting the /sup 3/He concentration to obtain maximum fusion or net power density (P/sub f/, P/sub net/) as a function of plasma temperature. The fuel cycle is further modified by means of adding tritium. The impact on the P/sub f/, the P/sub net/, the n tau requirements and required tritium breeding ratio is determined. The d-t cycle is also modified by reducing the tritium concentration. The results of this reduction are discussed.
  • The DOE is currently directing extensive research into developing fuel cycle technologies that will enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy. The task is formidable considering the numerous fuel cycle options, the large dynamic systems that each represent, and the necessity to accurately predict their behavior. The path to successfully develop and implement an advanced fuel cycle is highly dependent on the modeling capabilities and simulation tools available for performing useful relevant analysis to assist stakeholders in decision making. Therefore a high-fidelity fuel cycle simulation tool that performs system analysis, including uncertainty quantification and optimization wasmore » developed. The resulting simulator also includes the capability to calculate environmental impact measures for individual components and the system. An integrated system method and analysis approach that provides consistent and comprehensive evaluations of advanced fuel cycles was developed. A general approach was utilized allowing for the system to be modified in order to provide analysis for other systems with similar attributes. By utilizing this approach, the framework for simulating many different fuel cycle options is provided. Two example fuel cycle configurations were developed to take advantage of used fuel recycling and transmutation capabilities in waste management scenarios leading to minimized waste inventories.« less
  • The performance of an open-cycle adiabatic solid desiccant cooling system operating in the ventilation mode is modeled numerically. The effect of nondimensional dehumidifier channel length, desiccant mass fraction and desiccant isotherm shape are investigated. The results show the conditions where the system has optimum thermal coefficient of performance (COP). 13 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.