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Title: Neutrons Provide the First Nanoscale Look at a Living Cell Membrane

Abstract

Neutron scattering is a valuable technique for studying cell membranes, but signals from the cell’s other components such as proteins, RNA, DNA and carbohydrates can get in the way. An ORNL team made these other components practically invisible to neutrons by combining specific levels of heavy hydrogen (deuterium) with normal hydrogen within the cell.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1363809
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; CELLS; BIOMOLECULAR COMPONENTS; CELL MEMBRANE; BIOLOGICAL MEMBRANES; VIVO ISOTOPIC LABELING; LIPID RAFTS

Citation Formats

None. Neutrons Provide the First Nanoscale Look at a Living Cell Membrane. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
None. Neutrons Provide the First Nanoscale Look at a Living Cell Membrane. United States.
None. Wed . "Neutrons Provide the First Nanoscale Look at a Living Cell Membrane". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363809.
@article{osti_1363809,
title = {Neutrons Provide the First Nanoscale Look at a Living Cell Membrane},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {Neutron scattering is a valuable technique for studying cell membranes, but signals from the cell’s other components such as proteins, RNA, DNA and carbohydrates can get in the way. An ORNL team made these other components practically invisible to neutrons by combining specific levels of heavy hydrogen (deuterium) with normal hydrogen within the cell.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed May 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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