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Title: Taking Down a Giant: 699 Tons of SLAC’s Accelerator Removed for Upgrade

Abstract

For the first time in more than 50 years, a door opened at the western end of the historic linear accelerator at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory casts light on four empty walls stretching as far as the eye can see. This end of the linac – a full kilometer of it – has been stripped of all its equipment both above and below ground. Over the next two years it will be re-equipped with new technology to power another wonder of modern science: an X-ray laser that will fire a million pulses per second.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1363805
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; LINAC; X-RAY LASER; SLAC ACCELERATOR

Citation Formats

None. Taking Down a Giant: 699 Tons of SLAC’s Accelerator Removed for Upgrade. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
None. Taking Down a Giant: 699 Tons of SLAC’s Accelerator Removed for Upgrade. United States.
None. Tue . "Taking Down a Giant: 699 Tons of SLAC’s Accelerator Removed for Upgrade". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363805.
@article{osti_1363805,
title = {Taking Down a Giant: 699 Tons of SLAC’s Accelerator Removed for Upgrade},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {For the first time in more than 50 years, a door opened at the western end of the historic linear accelerator at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory casts light on four empty walls stretching as far as the eye can see. This end of the linac – a full kilometer of it – has been stripped of all its equipment both above and below ground. Over the next two years it will be re-equipped with new technology to power another wonder of modern science: an X-ray laser that will fire a million pulses per second.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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