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Title: What is the Universe made of?

Abstract

A team of physicists and astrophysicists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, in collaboration with leading universities around the country, are using the Laboratory’s supercomputers to simulate the Big Bang nucleosynthesis and the early universe to unprecedented precision. These researchers developed a code, called BURST that describes the universe from a time of a few seconds after the Big Bang to several hundred thousand years later. BURST allows physicists to study the microscopic, quantum nature of fundamental particles — like nuclei and the ghostly, weakly interacting neutrinos — by simulating the universe at its largest, cosmological scale. BURST simultaneously describes all the particles present in the early universe as they develop, tracking their evolution, particularly the amounts of light nuclei fused in the cosmic soup.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1363801
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; LANL; UNIVERSE; PARTICLES; PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; BURST; SUPERCOMPUTERS; NUCLEI; NEUTRINOS; DARK MATTER

Citation Formats

Paris, Mark. What is the Universe made of?. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Paris, Mark. What is the Universe made of?. United States.
Paris, Mark. Mon . "What is the Universe made of?". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363801.
@article{osti_1363801,
title = {What is the Universe made of?},
author = {Paris, Mark},
abstractNote = {A team of physicists and astrophysicists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, in collaboration with leading universities around the country, are using the Laboratory’s supercomputers to simulate the Big Bang nucleosynthesis and the early universe to unprecedented precision. These researchers developed a code, called BURST that describes the universe from a time of a few seconds after the Big Bang to several hundred thousand years later. BURST allows physicists to study the microscopic, quantum nature of fundamental particles — like nuclei and the ghostly, weakly interacting neutrinos — by simulating the universe at its largest, cosmological scale. BURST simultaneously describes all the particles present in the early universe as they develop, tracking their evolution, particularly the amounts of light nuclei fused in the cosmic soup.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 17 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 17 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}