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Title: Ultrasonic Clothes Dryer Dries Clothes in Half the Time

Abstract

Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are about to change the way that you do laundry. They recently developed an ultrasonic drying concept that uses vibrations instead of heat to dry clothes. This technology is expected to be up to five times more efficient than today’s products and will dry your clothes in half the time. In about two years, researchers took this basic science concept and recently developed it into a full-scale press dryer and clothes dryer drum – setting the stage for it to one day go to market through partners like General Electric Appliances. The ultrasonic dryer, which is supported by the Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office, is expected to cut drying time to about 20 minutes per load – down significantly from the average 50 minutes it currently takes Americans to do their laundry.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B); GE Appliances, Louisville, KY (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1363794
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 42 ENGINEERING; ULTRASONIC CLOTHES DRYER; CUSTOM AMPLIFIER; TRANSDUCERS

Citation Formats

None. Ultrasonic Clothes Dryer Dries Clothes in Half the Time. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
None. Ultrasonic Clothes Dryer Dries Clothes in Half the Time. United States.
None. Wed . "Ultrasonic Clothes Dryer Dries Clothes in Half the Time". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363794.
@article{osti_1363794,
title = {Ultrasonic Clothes Dryer Dries Clothes in Half the Time},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are about to change the way that you do laundry. They recently developed an ultrasonic drying concept that uses vibrations instead of heat to dry clothes. This technology is expected to be up to five times more efficient than today’s products and will dry your clothes in half the time. In about two years, researchers took this basic science concept and recently developed it into a full-scale press dryer and clothes dryer drum – setting the stage for it to one day go to market through partners like General Electric Appliances. The ultrasonic dryer, which is supported by the Department of Energy’s Building Technologies Office, is expected to cut drying time to about 20 minutes per load – down significantly from the average 50 minutes it currently takes Americans to do their laundry.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Apr 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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