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Title: Standardization of Color Palettes for Scientific Visualization

Abstract

The purpose of this white paper is to demonstrate the importance of color palette choice in scientific visualizations and to promote an effort to convene an interdisciplinary team of researchers to study and recommend color palettes based on intended application(s) and audience(s).

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1363736
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24665
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Kulesza, Joel A., Spencer, Joshua Bradly, and Sood, Avneet. Standardization of Color Palettes for Scientific Visualization. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1363736.
Kulesza, Joel A., Spencer, Joshua Bradly, & Sood, Avneet. Standardization of Color Palettes for Scientific Visualization. United States. doi:10.2172/1363736.
Kulesza, Joel A., Spencer, Joshua Bradly, and Sood, Avneet. Mon . "Standardization of Color Palettes for Scientific Visualization". United States. doi:10.2172/1363736. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363736.
@article{osti_1363736,
title = {Standardization of Color Palettes for Scientific Visualization},
author = {Kulesza, Joel A. and Spencer, Joshua Bradly and Sood, Avneet},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this white paper is to demonstrate the importance of color palette choice in scientific visualizations and to promote an effort to convene an interdisciplinary team of researchers to study and recommend color palettes based on intended application(s) and audience(s).},
doi = {10.2172/1363736},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jun 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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