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Title: The sensitivity of the Colorado River basin to temperature, precipitation and land cover change

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1363734
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24281
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Canadian Geophysical Union Conference ; 2017-05-28 - 2017-05-31 ; Vancouver, Canada
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Earth Sciences; streamflow, climate change, land cover change, sensitivity, Colorado River basin,

Citation Formats

Bennett, Katrina Eleanor, McDowell, Nathan, Xu, Chonggang, and Middleton, Richard Stephen. The sensitivity of the Colorado River basin to temperature, precipitation and land cover change. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Bennett, Katrina Eleanor, McDowell, Nathan, Xu, Chonggang, & Middleton, Richard Stephen. The sensitivity of the Colorado River basin to temperature, precipitation and land cover change. United States.
Bennett, Katrina Eleanor, McDowell, Nathan, Xu, Chonggang, and Middleton, Richard Stephen. Mon . "The sensitivity of the Colorado River basin to temperature, precipitation and land cover change". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363734.
@article{osti_1363734,
title = {The sensitivity of the Colorado River basin to temperature, precipitation and land cover change},
author = {Bennett, Katrina Eleanor and McDowell, Nathan and Xu, Chonggang and Middleton, Richard Stephen},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jun 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Growing international concern about the greenhouse effect has led to increased interest in the regional implications of changes in temperature and precipitation patterns for a wide range of societal and natural systems, including agriculture, sea level, biodiversity, and water resources. The accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere due to human activities are likely to have significant, though still poorly understood, impacts on water quality and availability. One method developed over the last several years for determining how regional water resources might be affected by climatic change is to develop scenarios of changes in temperature and precipitation and to usemore » hydrologic simulation models to study the impacts of these scenarios on runoff and water supply. In the paper the authors present the results of a multi-year study of the sensitivity of the hydrology and water resources systems in the Colorado River Basin to plausible climatic changes.« less
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