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Title: iVPIC: A low-­dispersion, energy-­conserving relativistic PIC solver for LPI simulations

Abstract

We have developed a novel low-­dispersion, exactly energy-­conserving PIC algorithm for the relativistic Vlasov-­Maxwell system. The approach features an exact energy conservation theorem while preserving the favorable performance and numerical dispersion properties of explicit PIC. The new algorithm has the potential to enable much longer laser-­plasma-­interaction (LPI) simulations than are currently possible.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC). Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1363732
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24605
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; Mathematics

Citation Formats

Chacon, Luis. iVPIC: A low-­dispersion, energy-­conserving relativistic PIC solver for LPI simulations. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1363732.
Chacon, Luis. iVPIC: A low-­dispersion, energy-­conserving relativistic PIC solver for LPI simulations. United States. doi:10.2172/1363732.
Chacon, Luis. 2017. "iVPIC: A low-­dispersion, energy-­conserving relativistic PIC solver for LPI simulations". United States. doi:10.2172/1363732. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1363732.
@article{osti_1363732,
title = {iVPIC: A low-­dispersion, energy-­conserving relativistic PIC solver for LPI simulations},
author = {Chacon, Luis},
abstractNote = {We have developed a novel low-­dispersion, exactly energy-­conserving PIC algorithm for the relativistic Vlasov-­Maxwell system. The approach features an exact energy conservation theorem while preserving the favorable performance and numerical dispersion properties of explicit PIC. The new algorithm has the potential to enable much longer laser-­plasma-­interaction (LPI) simulations than are currently possible.},
doi = {10.2172/1363732},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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