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Title: Biofuel production from Jerusalem artichoke tuber inulins: a review

Abstract

Jerusalem artichoke (JA) has a high productivity of tubers that are rich in inulins, a fructan polymer. These inulins can be easily broken down into fructose and glucose for conversion into ethanol by fermentation. This paper discusses tuber and inulin yields, effect of cultivar and environment on tuber productivity, and approaches to fermentation for ethanol production. Consolidated bioprocessing with Kluyveromyces marxianus has been the most popular approach for fermentation into ethanol. Apart from ethanol, fructose can be dehydrated into into 5-hydrolxymethylfurfural followed by catalytic conversion into hydrocarbons. Finally, findings from several studies indicate that this plant from tubers alone can produce ethanol at yields that rival corn and sugarcane ethanol. JA has tremendous potential for use as a bioenergy feedstock.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  2. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Renewable Bioproducts Inst. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Joint Inst. of Biological Sciences. Biosciences Division
  3. US Salinity Lab., Riverside, CA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Inst. of Agriculture. Dept. of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries. Center for Renewable Carbon; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Joint Inst. of Biological Sciences. Biosciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
Contributing Org.:
Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); US Salinity Lab., Riverside, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1362258
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biofuel Research Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2292-8782
Publisher:
BRTeam
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; Jerusalem artichoke; Inulin; Tuber yield; Ethanol yield; Fermentation of inulin; 5-HMF

Citation Formats

Bhagia, Samarthya, Akinosho, Hannah, Ferreira, Jorge F. S., and Ragauskas, Arthur J. Biofuel production from Jerusalem artichoke tuber inulins: a review. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.18331/BRJ2017.4.2.4.
Bhagia, Samarthya, Akinosho, Hannah, Ferreira, Jorge F. S., & Ragauskas, Arthur J. Biofuel production from Jerusalem artichoke tuber inulins: a review. United States. doi:10.18331/BRJ2017.4.2.4.
Bhagia, Samarthya, Akinosho, Hannah, Ferreira, Jorge F. S., and Ragauskas, Arthur J. Thu . "Biofuel production from Jerusalem artichoke tuber inulins: a review". United States. doi:10.18331/BRJ2017.4.2.4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1362258.
@article{osti_1362258,
title = {Biofuel production from Jerusalem artichoke tuber inulins: a review},
author = {Bhagia, Samarthya and Akinosho, Hannah and Ferreira, Jorge F. S. and Ragauskas, Arthur J.},
abstractNote = {Jerusalem artichoke (JA) has a high productivity of tubers that are rich in inulins, a fructan polymer. These inulins can be easily broken down into fructose and glucose for conversion into ethanol by fermentation. This paper discusses tuber and inulin yields, effect of cultivar and environment on tuber productivity, and approaches to fermentation for ethanol production. Consolidated bioprocessing with Kluyveromyces marxianus has been the most popular approach for fermentation into ethanol. Apart from ethanol, fructose can be dehydrated into into 5-hydrolxymethylfurfural followed by catalytic conversion into hydrocarbons. Finally, findings from several studies indicate that this plant from tubers alone can produce ethanol at yields that rival corn and sugarcane ethanol. JA has tremendous potential for use as a bioenergy feedstock.},
doi = {10.18331/BRJ2017.4.2.4},
journal = {Biofuel Research Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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