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Title: Evolution of the lithium morphology from cycling of thin film solid state batteries

Abstract

Thin film batteries with a Lipon electrolyte and Li metal anode can be cycled thousands of times. During this time there is a gradual redistribution of the lithium at the top surface; the morphology that develops depends on a number of factors but is largely driven by dewetting. In this work, this redistribution is characterized as functions of the cycle number, duty cycle, cathode composition, and protective coating over the lithium. Observations of wrinkled and pitted surfaces are discussed considering the effects of defects and diffusion in the lithium and influences of film stresses and surface energy. In conclusion, similar processes may impact solid state lithium batteries with higher energy per active area.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1362223
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Electroceramics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 38; Journal Issue: 2-4; Journal ID: ISSN 1385-3449
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; Lithium battery; Thin film battery; Lipon electrolyte

Citation Formats

Dudney, Nancy J. Evolution of the lithium morphology from cycling of thin film solid state batteries. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/s10832-017-0073-2.
Dudney, Nancy J. Evolution of the lithium morphology from cycling of thin film solid state batteries. United States. doi:10.1007/s10832-017-0073-2.
Dudney, Nancy J. Sat . "Evolution of the lithium morphology from cycling of thin film solid state batteries". United States. doi:10.1007/s10832-017-0073-2. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1362223.
@article{osti_1362223,
title = {Evolution of the lithium morphology from cycling of thin film solid state batteries},
author = {Dudney, Nancy J.},
abstractNote = {Thin film batteries with a Lipon electrolyte and Li metal anode can be cycled thousands of times. During this time there is a gradual redistribution of the lithium at the top surface; the morphology that develops depends on a number of factors but is largely driven by dewetting. In this work, this redistribution is characterized as functions of the cycle number, duty cycle, cathode composition, and protective coating over the lithium. Observations of wrinkled and pitted surfaces are discussed considering the effects of defects and diffusion in the lithium and influences of film stresses and surface energy. In conclusion, similar processes may impact solid state lithium batteries with higher energy per active area.},
doi = {10.1007/s10832-017-0073-2},
journal = {Journal of Electroceramics},
number = 2-4,
volume = 38,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Mar 11 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sat Mar 11 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
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  • Abstract not provided.