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Title: Profiling microbial lignocellulose degradation and utilization by emergent omics technologies

Abstract

The use of plant materials to generate renewable biofuels and other high-value chemicals is the sustainable and preferable option, but will require considerable improvements to increase the rate and efficiency of lignocellulose depolymerization. This review highlights novel and emergent technologies that are being developed and deployed to characterize the process of lignocellulose degradation. The review will also illustrate how microbial communities deconstruct and metabolize lignocellulose by identifying the necessary genes and enzyme activities along with the reaction products. These technologies include multi-omic measurements, cell sorting and isolation, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), activity-based protein profiling, and direct measurement of enzyme activity. The recalcitrant nature of lignocellulose necessitates the need to characterize the methods microbes employ to deconstruct lignocellulose to inform new strategies on how to greatly improve biofuel conversion processes. New technologies are yielding important insights into microbial functions and strategies employed to degrade lignocellulose, providing a mechanistic blueprint to advance biofuel production.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1361978
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-116817
Journal ID: ISSN 0738-8551; 48680; KP1601010
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: CRC Critical Reviews in Biotechnology; Journal Volume: 37; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Rosnow, Joshua J., Anderson, Lindsey N., Nair, Reji N., Baker, Erin S., and Wright, Aaron T.. Profiling microbial lignocellulose degradation and utilization by emergent omics technologies. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1080/07388551.2016.1209158.
Rosnow, Joshua J., Anderson, Lindsey N., Nair, Reji N., Baker, Erin S., & Wright, Aaron T.. Profiling microbial lignocellulose degradation and utilization by emergent omics technologies. United States. doi:10.1080/07388551.2016.1209158.
Rosnow, Joshua J., Anderson, Lindsey N., Nair, Reji N., Baker, Erin S., and Wright, Aaron T.. 2016. "Profiling microbial lignocellulose degradation and utilization by emergent omics technologies". United States. doi:10.1080/07388551.2016.1209158.
@article{osti_1361978,
title = {Profiling microbial lignocellulose degradation and utilization by emergent omics technologies},
author = {Rosnow, Joshua J. and Anderson, Lindsey N. and Nair, Reji N. and Baker, Erin S. and Wright, Aaron T.},
abstractNote = {The use of plant materials to generate renewable biofuels and other high-value chemicals is the sustainable and preferable option, but will require considerable improvements to increase the rate and efficiency of lignocellulose depolymerization. This review highlights novel and emergent technologies that are being developed and deployed to characterize the process of lignocellulose degradation. The review will also illustrate how microbial communities deconstruct and metabolize lignocellulose by identifying the necessary genes and enzyme activities along with the reaction products. These technologies include multi-omic measurements, cell sorting and isolation, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), activity-based protein profiling, and direct measurement of enzyme activity. The recalcitrant nature of lignocellulose necessitates the need to characterize the methods microbes employ to deconstruct lignocellulose to inform new strategies on how to greatly improve biofuel conversion processes. New technologies are yielding important insights into microbial functions and strategies employed to degrade lignocellulose, providing a mechanistic blueprint to advance biofuel production.},
doi = {10.1080/07388551.2016.1209158},
journal = {CRC Critical Reviews in Biotechnology},
number = 5,
volume = 37,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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