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Title: Airborne observations reveal elevational gradient in tropical forest isoprene emissions

Abstract

Terrestrial vegetation emits vast quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to he atmosphere1-3, which influence oxidants and aerosols leading to complex feedbacks on air quality and climate4-6. Isoprene dominates global non-methane VOC emissions with tropical regions contributing ~80% of global isoprene emissions2. Isoprene emission rates vary over several orders of magnitude for different plant species, and characterizing this immense biological chemodiversity is a challenge for estimating isoprene emission from tropical forests. Here we present the isoprene emission estimates from aircraft direct eddy covariance measurements over the pristine Amazon forest. We report isoprene emission rates that are 3 times higher than satellite top-down estimates and 35% higher than model predictions based on satellite land cover and vegetation specific emission factors (EFs). The results reveal strong correlations between observed isoprene emission rates and terrain elevations which are confirmed by similar correlations between satellite-derived isoprene emissions and terrain elevations. We propose that the elevational gradient in the Amazonian forest isoprene emission capacity is determined by plant species distributions and can explain a substantial degree of isoprene emission variability in tropical forests. Finally, we apply this approach over the central Amazon and use a model to demonstrate the impacts on regional air quality.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [2];  [4];  [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [12];  [8] more »;  [2];  [2] « less
  1. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  3. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Anhui (China)
  4. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)
  5. Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)
  6. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)
  7. Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium)
  8. National Institute for Space Research, Sao Paulo (Brazil)
  9. Univ. Federal do Oeste do Para, Para (Brazil)
  10. Univ. do Estado do Amazonas, Amazonas (Brazil)
  11. Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil)
  12. National Institute for Amazonian Research, Amazonas (Brazil)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1361963
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-125338; PNNL-SA-128460
Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723; KP1701000
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; atmospheric chemistry; biogeochemistry

Citation Formats

Gu, Dasa, Guenther, Alex B., Shilling, John E., Yu, Haofei, Huang, Maoyi, Zhao, Chun, Yang, Qing, Martin, Scot T., Artaxo, Paulo, Kim, Saewung, Seco, Roger, Stavrakou, Trissevgeni, Longo, Karla M., Tota, Julio, de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto Ferreira, Vega, Oscar, Liu, Ying, Shrivastava, Manish, Alves, Eliane G., Santos, Fernando C., Leng, Guoyong, and Hu, Zhiyuan. Airborne observations reveal elevational gradient in tropical forest isoprene emissions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms15541.
Gu, Dasa, Guenther, Alex B., Shilling, John E., Yu, Haofei, Huang, Maoyi, Zhao, Chun, Yang, Qing, Martin, Scot T., Artaxo, Paulo, Kim, Saewung, Seco, Roger, Stavrakou, Trissevgeni, Longo, Karla M., Tota, Julio, de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto Ferreira, Vega, Oscar, Liu, Ying, Shrivastava, Manish, Alves, Eliane G., Santos, Fernando C., Leng, Guoyong, & Hu, Zhiyuan. Airborne observations reveal elevational gradient in tropical forest isoprene emissions. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms15541.
Gu, Dasa, Guenther, Alex B., Shilling, John E., Yu, Haofei, Huang, Maoyi, Zhao, Chun, Yang, Qing, Martin, Scot T., Artaxo, Paulo, Kim, Saewung, Seco, Roger, Stavrakou, Trissevgeni, Longo, Karla M., Tota, Julio, de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto Ferreira, Vega, Oscar, Liu, Ying, Shrivastava, Manish, Alves, Eliane G., Santos, Fernando C., Leng, Guoyong, and Hu, Zhiyuan. Tue . "Airborne observations reveal elevational gradient in tropical forest isoprene emissions". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms15541. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361963.
@article{osti_1361963,
title = {Airborne observations reveal elevational gradient in tropical forest isoprene emissions},
author = {Gu, Dasa and Guenther, Alex B. and Shilling, John E. and Yu, Haofei and Huang, Maoyi and Zhao, Chun and Yang, Qing and Martin, Scot T. and Artaxo, Paulo and Kim, Saewung and Seco, Roger and Stavrakou, Trissevgeni and Longo, Karla M. and Tota, Julio and de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto Ferreira and Vega, Oscar and Liu, Ying and Shrivastava, Manish and Alves, Eliane G. and Santos, Fernando C. and Leng, Guoyong and Hu, Zhiyuan},
abstractNote = {Terrestrial vegetation emits vast quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to he atmosphere1-3, which influence oxidants and aerosols leading to complex feedbacks on air quality and climate4-6. Isoprene dominates global non-methane VOC emissions with tropical regions contributing ~80% of global isoprene emissions2. Isoprene emission rates vary over several orders of magnitude for different plant species, and characterizing this immense biological chemodiversity is a challenge for estimating isoprene emission from tropical forests. Here we present the isoprene emission estimates from aircraft direct eddy covariance measurements over the pristine Amazon forest. We report isoprene emission rates that are 3 times higher than satellite top-down estimates and 35% higher than model predictions based on satellite land cover and vegetation specific emission factors (EFs). The results reveal strong correlations between observed isoprene emission rates and terrain elevations which are confirmed by similar correlations between satellite-derived isoprene emissions and terrain elevations. We propose that the elevational gradient in the Amazonian forest isoprene emission capacity is determined by plant species distributions and can explain a substantial degree of isoprene emission variability in tropical forests. Finally, we apply this approach over the central Amazon and use a model to demonstrate the impacts on regional air quality.},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms15541},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = ,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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