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Title: Predicting Ice Shape Evolution in a Bulk Microphysics Model

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado
  2. The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
  3. Meteorological Research Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1361944
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-05ER64058; SC0012827
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 74; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-08-01 12:38:00; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-4928
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Jensen, Anders A., Harrington, Jerry Y., Morrison, Hugh, and Milbrandt, Jason A. Predicting Ice Shape Evolution in a Bulk Microphysics Model. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1175/JAS-D-16-0350.1.
Jensen, Anders A., Harrington, Jerry Y., Morrison, Hugh, & Milbrandt, Jason A. Predicting Ice Shape Evolution in a Bulk Microphysics Model. United States. doi:10.1175/JAS-D-16-0350.1.
Jensen, Anders A., Harrington, Jerry Y., Morrison, Hugh, and Milbrandt, Jason A. Tue . "Predicting Ice Shape Evolution in a Bulk Microphysics Model". United States. doi:10.1175/JAS-D-16-0350.1.
@article{osti_1361944,
title = {Predicting Ice Shape Evolution in a Bulk Microphysics Model},
author = {Jensen, Anders A. and Harrington, Jerry Y. and Morrison, Hugh and Milbrandt, Jason A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1175/JAS-D-16-0350.1},
journal = {Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences},
number = 6,
volume = 74,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on June 8, 2018
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  • Cited by 13
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