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Title: Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of highly excited pyrrole studied with VUV/UV pump probe spectroscopy

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA
  2. Department of Chemistry, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1361773
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-08ER15984
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Chemical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 146; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-14 19:57:09; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Horton, Spencer L., Liu, Yusong, Chakraborty, Pratip, Matsika, Spiridoula, and Weinacht, Thomas. Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of highly excited pyrrole studied with VUV/UV pump probe spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4975765.
Horton, Spencer L., Liu, Yusong, Chakraborty, Pratip, Matsika, Spiridoula, & Weinacht, Thomas. Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of highly excited pyrrole studied with VUV/UV pump probe spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4975765.
Horton, Spencer L., Liu, Yusong, Chakraborty, Pratip, Matsika, Spiridoula, and Weinacht, Thomas. Tue . "Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of highly excited pyrrole studied with VUV/UV pump probe spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4975765.
@article{osti_1361773,
title = {Ultrafast internal conversion dynamics of highly excited pyrrole studied with VUV/UV pump probe spectroscopy},
author = {Horton, Spencer L. and Liu, Yusong and Chakraborty, Pratip and Matsika, Spiridoula and Weinacht, Thomas},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4975765},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 146,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 14 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 14 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.4975765

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
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