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Title: Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses

Abstract

Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr 51Ti 5Ni 10Cu 25Al 9 and Zr 50.7Cu 28Ni 9Al 12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. In conclusion, the liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Harbin Institute of Technology (China)
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1361545
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0008855
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; glasses; metals and alloys

Citation Formats

Huang, Yongjiang, Xue, Peng, Guo, Shu, Wu, Yang, Cheng, Xiang, Fan, Hongbo, Ning, Zhiliang, Cao, Fuyang, Xing, Dawei, Sun, Jianfei, and Liaw, Peter K. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/srep30674.
Huang, Yongjiang, Xue, Peng, Guo, Shu, Wu, Yang, Cheng, Xiang, Fan, Hongbo, Ning, Zhiliang, Cao, Fuyang, Xing, Dawei, Sun, Jianfei, & Liaw, Peter K. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses. United States. doi:10.1038/srep30674.
Huang, Yongjiang, Xue, Peng, Guo, Shu, Wu, Yang, Cheng, Xiang, Fan, Hongbo, Ning, Zhiliang, Cao, Fuyang, Xing, Dawei, Sun, Jianfei, and Liaw, Peter K. 2016. "Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses". United States. doi:10.1038/srep30674. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361545.
@article{osti_1361545,
title = {Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses},
author = {Huang, Yongjiang and Xue, Peng and Guo, Shu and Wu, Yang and Cheng, Xiang and Fan, Hongbo and Ning, Zhiliang and Cao, Fuyang and Xing, Dawei and Sun, Jianfei and Liaw, Peter K.},
abstractNote = {Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 and Zr50.7Cu28Ni9Al12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. In conclusion, the liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components.},
doi = {10.1038/srep30674},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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  • Results of calorimetric, differential thermal analysis, and structural measurements are presented for a series of bulk metallic glass forming compositions in the Zr[endash]Ti[endash]Cu[endash]Ni[endash]Be alloy system. The calorimetric data for five alloys, prepared along the tie line between phase separating and nonphase separating compositions, show that the transition from phase separating to nonphase separating behavior is smooth. The bulk glasses near the center of the tie line exhibit large supercooled liquid regions: [Delta]T[approx]135 K, the largest known for a bulk metallic glass. [copyright] [ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.]
  • Results of calorimetric, differential thermal analysis, and structural measurements are presented for a series of bulk metallic glass forming compositions in the Zr{endash}Ti{endash}Cu{endash}Ni{endash}Be alloy system. The calorimetric data for five alloys, prepared along the tie line between phase separating and nonphase separating compositions, show that the transition from phase separating to nonphase separating behavior is smooth. The bulk glasses near the center of the tie line exhibit large supercooled liquid regions: {Delta}T{approx}135 K, the largest known for a bulk metallic glass. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}
  • Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses have been measured by using the dilatometer with a self-sealed sample cell. It is demonstrated that the strong glass forming liquid not only has the small thermal expansion coefficient but also shows the slow variation rate. Moreover, the strong glass former has relatively dense atomic packing and also small density change in the liquid state. The results suggest that the high glass forming ability of La-based metallic glasses would be closely related to the slow atomic rearrangements in liquid melts.
  • For production of micro components in large numbers, forging is an interesting and challenging process. The conventional metals like silver, steel and aluminum often require multi-step processes, but high productivity and increased strength justify the investment. As an alternative, bulk metallic glasses will at elevated temperatures behave like a highly viscous liquid, which can easily form even complicated geometries in 1 step. The strengths and limitations of forming the 2 materials are analyzed for a micro 3D component in a silver alloy and an Mg-Cu-Y BMG.
  • Formation of bulk metallic glass in quaternary Ti--Zr--Cu--Ni alloys by relatively slow cooling from the melt is reported. Thick strips of metallic glass were obtained by the method of metal mold casting. The glass forming ability of the quaternary alloys exceeds that of binary or ternary alloys containing the same elements due to the complexity of the system. The best glass forming alloys such as Ti{sub 34}Zr{sub 11}Cu{sub 47}Ni{sub 8} can be cast to at least 4-mm-thick amorphous strips. The critical cooling rate for glass formation is of the order of 250 K/s or less, at least two orders ofmore » magnitude lower than that of the best ternary alloys. The glass transition, crystallization, and melting behavior of the alloys were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The amorphous alloys exhibit a significant undercooled liquid region between the glass transition and first crystallization event. The glass forming ability of these alloys, as determined by the critical cooling rate, exceeds what is expected based on the reduced glass transition temperature. It is also found that the glass forming ability for alloys of similar reduced glass transition temperature can differ by two orders of magnitude as defined by critical cooling rates. The origins of the difference in glass forming ability of the alloys are discussed. It is found that when large composition redistribution accompanies crystallization, glass formation is enhanced. The excellent glass forming ability of alloys such as Ti{sub 34}Zr{sub 11}Cu{sub 47}Ni{sub 8} is a result of simultaneously minimizing the nucleation rate of the competing crystalline phases. The ternary/quaternary Laves phase (MgZn{sub 2} type) shows the greatest ease of nucleation and plays a key role in determining the optimum compositions for glass formation. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.« less