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Title: Poking our way to stronger and safer materials for nuclear energy applications

Abstract

This report describes methods and applications for nuclear energy.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [1];  [3];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1361488
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24520
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Weaver, Jordan, Pathak, Siddhartha, Reichardt, Ashley, Vo, Hi, Maloy, Stuart Andrew, Hosemann, Peter, and Mara, Nathan Allan. Poking our way to stronger and safer materials for nuclear energy applications. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1361488.
Weaver, Jordan, Pathak, Siddhartha, Reichardt, Ashley, Vo, Hi, Maloy, Stuart Andrew, Hosemann, Peter, & Mara, Nathan Allan. Poking our way to stronger and safer materials for nuclear energy applications. United States. doi:10.2172/1361488.
Weaver, Jordan, Pathak, Siddhartha, Reichardt, Ashley, Vo, Hi, Maloy, Stuart Andrew, Hosemann, Peter, and Mara, Nathan Allan. 2017. "Poking our way to stronger and safer materials for nuclear energy applications". United States. doi:10.2172/1361488. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361488.
@article{osti_1361488,
title = {Poking our way to stronger and safer materials for nuclear energy applications},
author = {Weaver, Jordan and Pathak, Siddhartha and Reichardt, Ashley and Vo, Hi and Maloy, Stuart Andrew and Hosemann, Peter and Mara, Nathan Allan},
abstractNote = {This report describes methods and applications for nuclear energy.},
doi = {10.2172/1361488},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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