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Title: Compiling on Linux Clusters

Abstract

This is a presentation for LANL's Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship that describes the process of compiling Linux clusters.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1361471
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24453
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; Computer Science

Citation Formats

Garrett, Charles Kristopher. Compiling on Linux Clusters. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1361471.
Garrett, Charles Kristopher. Compiling on Linux Clusters. United States. doi:10.2172/1361471.
Garrett, Charles Kristopher. Fri . "Compiling on Linux Clusters". United States. doi:10.2172/1361471. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361471.
@article{osti_1361471,
title = {Compiling on Linux Clusters},
author = {Garrett, Charles Kristopher},
abstractNote = {This is a presentation for LANL's Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship that describes the process of compiling Linux clusters.},
doi = {10.2172/1361471},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Jun 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Livermore Computing (LC) Linux Integration and Development Project (the Linux Project) produces and supports the Clustered High Availability Operating System (CHAOS), a cluster operating environment based on Red Hat Linux. Each CHAOS release begins with a set of requirements and ends with a formally tested, packaged, and documented release suitable for use on LC's production Linux clusters. One characteristic of CHAOS is that component software packages come from different sources under varying degrees of project control. Some are developed by the Linux Project, some are developed by other LC projects, some are external open source projects, and some aremore » commercial software packages. A challenge to the Linux Project is to adhere to release schedules and testing disciplines in a diverse, highly decentralized development environment. Communication channels are maintained for externally developed packages in order to obtain support, influence development decisions, and coordinate/understand release schedules. The Linux Project embraces open source by releasing locally developed packages under open source license, by collaborating with open source projects where mutually beneficial, and by preferring open source over proprietary software. Project members generally use open source development tools. The Linux Project requires system administrators and developers to work together to resolve problems that arise in production. This tight coupling of production and development is a key strategy for making a product that directly addresses LC's production requirements. It is another challenge to balance support and development activities in such a way that one does not overwhelm the other.« less
  • Current languages for nonshared memory architectures provide a relative low-level programming environment. A set of primitives such as load balance and data distribution, which allow the programmer to express data-parallel algorithms at a higher level while also permitting control over those aspects of the program critical to performance, are described. Given such a program specification, the compiler automatically generates a distributed program containing send and receive constructs to perform interprocess communication.
  • The report contains technical materials that will assist state and local control agencies in compiling air toxics emission inventories. It contains a discussion of various considerations that should be made in planning and beginning an inventory and various tools an agency can use to locate potential sources and to estimate emissions therefrom. The appendices contain the data needed to use these inventory tools and some example applications of them.
  • This report contains technical materials that will assist state and local control agencies in compiling air-toxics emission inventories. It contains a discussion of (1) various considerations that should be made in planning and beginning an inventory, and (2) various tools an agency can use to locate potential sources and to estimate emissions therefrom. The appendices contain the data needed to use these inventory tools and some example applications of them.