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Title: Nature of the effective interaction in electron-doped cuprate superconductors: A sign-problem-free quantum Monte Carlo study

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1361443
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review B
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 21; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-06-05 22:10:20; Journal ID: ISSN 2469-9950
Publisher:
American Physical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Li, Zi-Xiang, Wang, Fa, Yao, Hong, and Lee, Dung-Hai. Nature of the effective interaction in electron-doped cuprate superconductors: A sign-problem-free quantum Monte Carlo study. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.95.214505.
Li, Zi-Xiang, Wang, Fa, Yao, Hong, & Lee, Dung-Hai. Nature of the effective interaction in electron-doped cuprate superconductors: A sign-problem-free quantum Monte Carlo study. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.95.214505.
Li, Zi-Xiang, Wang, Fa, Yao, Hong, and Lee, Dung-Hai. Mon . "Nature of the effective interaction in electron-doped cuprate superconductors: A sign-problem-free quantum Monte Carlo study". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.95.214505.
@article{osti_1361443,
title = {Nature of the effective interaction in electron-doped cuprate superconductors: A sign-problem-free quantum Monte Carlo study},
author = {Li, Zi-Xiang and Wang, Fa and Yao, Hong and Lee, Dung-Hai},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevB.95.214505},
journal = {Physical Review B},
number = 21,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jun 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on June 5, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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