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Title: Single-Crystal Tungsten Carbide in High-Temperature In-Situ Additive Manufacturing Characterization

Abstract

Nanoindenters are commonly used for measuring the mechanical properties of a wide variety of materials with both industrial and scientific applications. Typically, these instruments employ an indenter made of a material of suitable hardness bonded to an appropriate shaft or holder to create an indentation on the material being tested. While a variety of materials may be employed for the indenter, diamond and boron carbide are by far the most common materials used due to their hardness and other desirable properties. However, as the increasing complexity of new materials demands a broader range of testing capabilities, conventional indenter materials exhibit significant performance limitations. Among these are the inability of diamond indenters to perform in-situ measurements at temperatures above 600oC in air due to oxidation of the diamond material and subsequent degradation of the indenters mechanical properties. Similarly, boron carbide also fails at high temperature due to fracture. [1] Transition metal carbides possess a combination of hardness and mechanical properties at high temperatures that offer an attractive alternative to conventional indenter materials. Here we describe the technical aspects for the growth of single-crystal tungsten carbide (WC) for use as a high-temperature indenter material, and we examine a possible approach to brazingmore » these crystals to a suitable mount for grinding and attachment to the indenter instrument. The use of a by-product of the recovery process is also suggested as possibly having commercial value.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1361361
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2017/168
ED2802000; CEED492; CRADA/NFE-16-06110
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; high-temperature indenter material; single-crystal tungsten carbide crystals; bonding of the crystal material to the indenter shaft

Citation Formats

Kolopus, James A., and Boatner, Lynn A.. Single-Crystal Tungsten Carbide in High-Temperature In-Situ Additive Manufacturing Characterization. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1361361.
Kolopus, James A., & Boatner, Lynn A.. Single-Crystal Tungsten Carbide in High-Temperature In-Situ Additive Manufacturing Characterization. United States. doi:10.2172/1361361.
Kolopus, James A., and Boatner, Lynn A.. Thu . "Single-Crystal Tungsten Carbide in High-Temperature In-Situ Additive Manufacturing Characterization". United States. doi:10.2172/1361361. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361361.
@article{osti_1361361,
title = {Single-Crystal Tungsten Carbide in High-Temperature In-Situ Additive Manufacturing Characterization},
author = {Kolopus, James A. and Boatner, Lynn A.},
abstractNote = {Nanoindenters are commonly used for measuring the mechanical properties of a wide variety of materials with both industrial and scientific applications. Typically, these instruments employ an indenter made of a material of suitable hardness bonded to an appropriate shaft or holder to create an indentation on the material being tested. While a variety of materials may be employed for the indenter, diamond and boron carbide are by far the most common materials used due to their hardness and other desirable properties. However, as the increasing complexity of new materials demands a broader range of testing capabilities, conventional indenter materials exhibit significant performance limitations. Among these are the inability of diamond indenters to perform in-situ measurements at temperatures above 600oC in air due to oxidation of the diamond material and subsequent degradation of the indenters mechanical properties. Similarly, boron carbide also fails at high temperature due to fracture. [1] Transition metal carbides possess a combination of hardness and mechanical properties at high temperatures that offer an attractive alternative to conventional indenter materials. Here we describe the technical aspects for the growth of single-crystal tungsten carbide (WC) for use as a high-temperature indenter material, and we examine a possible approach to brazing these crystals to a suitable mount for grinding and attachment to the indenter instrument. The use of a by-product of the recovery process is also suggested as possibly having commercial value.},
doi = {10.2172/1361361},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu May 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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