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Title: Introduction to a Virtual Issue on root traits

Abstract

Plant traits – ‘morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochem-ical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs’(Kattge et al., 2011) – are increasingly being harnessed byempiricists and modelers as a framework to understand patternsin the structure and function of specie s across the globe. Trait-basedecology, which emphasizes functional traits over the taxonomicalrelationships among organisms (Laliberte, 2017), promises toimprove generality, synthesis, and predictive ability across ecolog-ical scales (Shipley et al., 2016). Indeed, plant trait studies areincreasingly prominent in the literature: a simple Web of Sciencesearch on the term indicates a surge in publications from 2576during the three-year period from 1999 to 2001 to 13 234 in thethree-year period between 2014 and 2016. However, the mostcommon plant traits described in the literature relate to above -ground organs and their function, including leaf morphology,photosynthetic parameters, and above ground growth rate. Roottraits, particularly those of fine roots associated with criticalbelowground plant functions, are much less studied – they are, afterall, harder to measure and less likely to have a role in ecosystemmodels as they are encoded today. Although the TRY database ofplant traits (Kattge et al., 2011) has been a highly valuable resourcefor plant and ecosystem ecologists, < 1% of the data entries describefine-root functional traits.more » This glaring gap in our knowledge of thebelowground half of ecosystem function has led to a chorus of pleasin recent years for a stronger emphasis on the measurement andunderstanding of root traits (e.g . Bardgett et al., 2014).« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1361335
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1401307
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
New Phytologist
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 215; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0028-646X
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Norby, Richard J., and Iversen, Colleen M. Introduction to a Virtual Issue on root traits. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/nph.14522.
Norby, Richard J., & Iversen, Colleen M. Introduction to a Virtual Issue on root traits. United States. doi:10.1111/nph.14522.
Norby, Richard J., and Iversen, Colleen M. Wed . "Introduction to a Virtual Issue on root traits". United States. doi:10.1111/nph.14522. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361335.
@article{osti_1361335,
title = {Introduction to a Virtual Issue on root traits},
author = {Norby, Richard J. and Iversen, Colleen M.},
abstractNote = {Plant traits – ‘morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochem-ical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs’(Kattge et al., 2011) – are increasingly being harnessed byempiricists and modelers as a framework to understand patternsin the structure and function of specie s across the globe. Trait-basedecology, which emphasizes functional traits over the taxonomicalrelationships among organisms (Laliberte, 2017), promises toimprove generality, synthesis, and predictive ability across ecolog-ical scales (Shipley et al., 2016). Indeed, plant trait studies areincreasingly prominent in the literature: a simple Web of Sciencesearch on the term indicates a surge in publications from 2576during the three-year period from 1999 to 2001 to 13 234 in thethree-year period between 2014 and 2016. However, the mostcommon plant traits described in the literature relate to above -ground organs and their function, including leaf morphology,photosynthetic parameters, and above ground growth rate. Roottraits, particularly those of fine roots associated with criticalbelowground plant functions, are much less studied – they are, afterall, harder to measure and less likely to have a role in ecosystemmodels as they are encoded today. Although the TRY database ofplant traits (Kattge et al., 2011) has been a highly valuable resourcefor plant and ecosystem ecologists, < 1% of the data entries describefine-root functional traits. This glaring gap in our knowledge of thebelowground half of ecosystem function has led to a chorus of pleasin recent years for a stronger emphasis on the measurement andunderstanding of root traits (e.g . Bardgett et al., 2014).},
doi = {10.1111/nph.14522},
journal = {New Phytologist},
number = 1,
volume = 215,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed May 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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