skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Correlating Laboratory Oil Aerosol Coking Rig Tests to Diesel Engine Tests to Understand the Mechanisms Responsible for Turbocharger Compressor Coking

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [1]
  1. Ford Motor Company
  2. Lubrizol Corporation
  3. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
1361316
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 1; Conference: 2017 SAE World Congress, Detroit, MI, USA, 20170404, 20170404
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Uy, Dairene, Michlberger, Alex, Streck, Kevin, Lance, Michael J, Morelli, Anthony, Gangopadhyay, Arup, Wereszczak, Andrew A, and Pranis, George. Correlating Laboratory Oil Aerosol Coking Rig Tests to Diesel Engine Tests to Understand the Mechanisms Responsible for Turbocharger Compressor Coking. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.4271/2017-01-0887.
Uy, Dairene, Michlberger, Alex, Streck, Kevin, Lance, Michael J, Morelli, Anthony, Gangopadhyay, Arup, Wereszczak, Andrew A, & Pranis, George. Correlating Laboratory Oil Aerosol Coking Rig Tests to Diesel Engine Tests to Understand the Mechanisms Responsible for Turbocharger Compressor Coking. United States. doi:10.4271/2017-01-0887.
Uy, Dairene, Michlberger, Alex, Streck, Kevin, Lance, Michael J, Morelli, Anthony, Gangopadhyay, Arup, Wereszczak, Andrew A, and Pranis, George. Sun . "Correlating Laboratory Oil Aerosol Coking Rig Tests to Diesel Engine Tests to Understand the Mechanisms Responsible for Turbocharger Compressor Coking". United States. doi:10.4271/2017-01-0887.
@article{osti_1361316,
title = {Correlating Laboratory Oil Aerosol Coking Rig Tests to Diesel Engine Tests to Understand the Mechanisms Responsible for Turbocharger Compressor Coking},
author = {Uy, Dairene and Michlberger, Alex and Streck, Kevin and Lance, Michael J and Morelli, Anthony and Gangopadhyay, Arup and Wereszczak, Andrew A and Pranis, George},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.4271/2017-01-0887},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • The relationship of shear stability in laboratory tests to shear stability in service was investigated in a diesel injector test, in the L-38 single-cylinder engine, in a multi-cylinder engine equipped for bearing film thickness measurement, and in road testing in an automobile and in trucks. All of the laboratory and road tests differed in severity of shearing and also showed that major VI improver types differed in the time needed for their kinematic viscosity to approach a fully-sheared value. Shear stability comparisons based on kinematic viscosities measured during the transition to the fully sheared condition did not accurately represent themore » relative shear stability of VI improvers in the fully-sheared condition. In the road tests, most of the oils were at their fully-sheared viscosity for the major part of their service life. The decrease of HTHS viscosity due to shearing in the road test and laboratory engines was usually less than half the kinematic viscosity decrease. Bearing oil film thicknesses showed little or no change with test duration in the multicylinder lab engine and correlate well with HTHS viscosity.« less
  • This paper compares the effects of using a 25 to 75 blend (v/v) of alkali refined sunflower oil and diesel fuel in a diesel engine as compared to a baseline test on diesel fuel. There were no significant problems with engine operation during the baseline test. However, problems were experienced while using the blended fuel. The major problems were (1) abnormal buildup on the injection nozzle tips, (2) injector needle sticking, (3) secondary injection, (4) carbon buildup in the intake ports, (5) carbon deposits on the exhaust valve stems, (6) carbon filling of the compression ring grooves, and (7) abnormalmore » lacquer and varnish buildup on the third piston land. 6 figures, 4 tables.« less
  • Emergency cooling simulation tests were conducted on a single electrically heated test channel representative of Savannah River Plant fuel assembly flow channels. The primary objective was to investigate downflow, air-water hydraulic flow conditions that lead to the onset of a runaway thermal excursion in the range of superficial liquid and gas velocities, 1.4 m/sec and 1 m/sec, respectively. The thermal excursion power normalized by the power to reach fluid outlet saturation conditions, or R-factor, was found to decrease from values close to 2, at annular flow conditions to approximately 0.8 at low to zero void fractions. 3 refs., 9 figs.
  • This paper describes a study carried out in order to determine the effects on the engine performances and exhaust emissions of ethanol and water as internal phases in diesel fuel unstabilized emulsions - directly formed the injection line. Comparison with the diesel fuel operation was made by using two different criteria: constant total energy input rate and constant total mass flow into the engine. Further experiments, varying the load and the injection timing, were also carried out. The results are discussed.
  • The effect of injector tip temperature on coking propencity when sunflower oil is used as a fuel for direct injection engines, was tested. Partial retraction of the injector, the addition of a heat shield to the injector and cooling the injector with water was tried. Also, injector temperature was increased by reducing heat transferred to the cylinder head and preheating the sunflower oil. None of these measures could prevent coking of the injector tip. Coating the injector tip with Teflon and increasing the back leakage rate was also tried without success. Only a few of many additives tested, showed somemore » promise of being able to prevent coking. 5 figures, 1 table.« less