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Title: Solidification and solid-state transformation sciences in metals additive manufacturing

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) of metals is rapidly emerging as an established manufacturing process for metal components. Unlike traditional metals fabrication processes, metals fabricated via AM undergo localized thermal cycles during fabrication. As a result, AM presents the opportunity to control the liquid-solid phase transformation, i.e. material texture. But, thermal cycling presents challenges from the standpoint of solid-solid phase transformations. We will discuss the opportunities and challenges in metals AM in the context of texture control and associated solid-solid phase transformations in Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility, Materials Science and Technology Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Advanced Manufacturing Office (EE-5A)
OSTI Identifier:
1361307
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1415687
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scripta Materialia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 135; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-6462
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Additive manufacturing; Phase transformations; Computational modeling; Superalloys; Titanium alloys

Citation Formats

Kirka, Michael M., Nandwana, Peeyush, Lee, Yousub, and Dehoff, Ryan R. Solidification and solid-state transformation sciences in metals additive manufacturing. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scriptamat.2017.01.005.
Kirka, Michael M., Nandwana, Peeyush, Lee, Yousub, & Dehoff, Ryan R. Solidification and solid-state transformation sciences in metals additive manufacturing. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scriptamat.2017.01.005.
Kirka, Michael M., Nandwana, Peeyush, Lee, Yousub, and Dehoff, Ryan R. Sat . "Solidification and solid-state transformation sciences in metals additive manufacturing". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scriptamat.2017.01.005. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361307.
@article{osti_1361307,
title = {Solidification and solid-state transformation sciences in metals additive manufacturing},
author = {Kirka, Michael M. and Nandwana, Peeyush and Lee, Yousub and Dehoff, Ryan R.},
abstractNote = {Additive manufacturing (AM) of metals is rapidly emerging as an established manufacturing process for metal components. Unlike traditional metals fabrication processes, metals fabricated via AM undergo localized thermal cycles during fabrication. As a result, AM presents the opportunity to control the liquid-solid phase transformation, i.e. material texture. But, thermal cycling presents challenges from the standpoint of solid-solid phase transformations. We will discuss the opportunities and challenges in metals AM in the context of texture control and associated solid-solid phase transformations in Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scriptamat.2017.01.005},
journal = {Scripta Materialia},
number = C,
volume = 135,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Feb 11 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sat Feb 11 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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