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Title: Hexcrete Tower for Harvesting Wind Energy at Taller Hub Heights - Budget Period 2

Abstract

Interest in designing taller towers for wind energy production in the United States (U.S.) has been steadily growing. In May 2015, it was revealed that taller towers will make wind energy production a reality in all 50 states, including some states that have nearly zero renewables in their energy portfolio. Facilitating wind energy production feasibility in all 50 states will no doubt contribute to increasing the electricity produced by wind from 4.5% in 2013 to a targeted scenario of 35% by 2050 in the Wind Vision report. This project focuses on the Hexcrete tower concept developed for tall towers using High Strength Concrete (HSC) and/or Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC). Among other benefits, the Hexcrete concept overcomes transportation and logistical challenges, thus facilitating construction of towers with hub heights of 100-m (328-ft) and higher. The goal of this project is to facilitate widespread deployment of Hexcrete towers for harvesting wind energy at 120 to 140-m (394 to 459-ft) hub heights and reduce the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of wind energy production in the U.S. The technical scope of the project includes detailed design and optimization of at least three wind turbine towers using the Hexcrete concept together with experimental validationmore » and LCOE analyses and development of a commercialization plan.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind Energy Technologies Office (EE-4WE)
Contributing Org.:
LaFargeHolcim; Mortenson Construction; Barr Engineering; Midstate Precast; Oldcastle; Pattern Energy; Structural Technologies; Sumiden Wire Products Corporation; Wells Concrete
OSTI Identifier:
1361022
Report Number(s):
DOE-ISU-06737-1
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006737
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; concrete; hexcrete; wind energy; tall; towers; turbine

Citation Formats

Sritharan, Sri. Hexcrete Tower for Harvesting Wind Energy at Taller Hub Heights - Budget Period 2. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1361022.
Sritharan, Sri. Hexcrete Tower for Harvesting Wind Energy at Taller Hub Heights - Budget Period 2. United States. doi:10.2172/1361022.
Sritharan, Sri. Mon . "Hexcrete Tower for Harvesting Wind Energy at Taller Hub Heights - Budget Period 2". United States. doi:10.2172/1361022. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361022.
@article{osti_1361022,
title = {Hexcrete Tower for Harvesting Wind Energy at Taller Hub Heights - Budget Period 2},
author = {Sritharan, Sri},
abstractNote = {Interest in designing taller towers for wind energy production in the United States (U.S.) has been steadily growing. In May 2015, it was revealed that taller towers will make wind energy production a reality in all 50 states, including some states that have nearly zero renewables in their energy portfolio. Facilitating wind energy production feasibility in all 50 states will no doubt contribute to increasing the electricity produced by wind from 4.5% in 2013 to a targeted scenario of 35% by 2050 in the Wind Vision report. This project focuses on the Hexcrete tower concept developed for tall towers using High Strength Concrete (HSC) and/or Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC). Among other benefits, the Hexcrete concept overcomes transportation and logistical challenges, thus facilitating construction of towers with hub heights of 100-m (328-ft) and higher. The goal of this project is to facilitate widespread deployment of Hexcrete towers for harvesting wind energy at 120 to 140-m (394 to 459-ft) hub heights and reduce the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of wind energy production in the U.S. The technical scope of the project includes detailed design and optimization of at least three wind turbine towers using the Hexcrete concept together with experimental validation and LCOE analyses and development of a commercialization plan.},
doi = {10.2172/1361022},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Measurements of wind characteristics over a wide range of heights up to and above 100 m are useful to: (1) characterize the local and regional wind climate; (2) validate wind resource estimates derived from numerical models; and (3) evaluate changes in wind characteristics and wind shear over the area swept by the blades. Developing wind climatology at advanced turbine hub heights for the United States benefits wind energy development. Tall tower data from Kansas, Indiana, and Minnesota (which have the greatest number of tall towers with measurement data) will be the focus of this paper. Analyses of data from themore » tall towers will start the process of developing a comprehensive climatology.« less
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