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Title: Deinococcus Mn 2+ -peptide complex: A novel approach to alphavirus vaccine development

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1360860
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Vaccine
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 29; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-06-02 20:45:36; Journal ID: ISSN 0264-410X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Gayen, Manoshi, Gupta, Paridhi, Morazzani, Elaine M., Gaidamakova, Elena K., Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara, Daly, Michael J., Glass, Pamela J., and Maheshwari, Radha K. Deinococcus Mn 2+ -peptide complex: A novel approach to alphavirus vaccine development. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.05.016.
Gayen, Manoshi, Gupta, Paridhi, Morazzani, Elaine M., Gaidamakova, Elena K., Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara, Daly, Michael J., Glass, Pamela J., & Maheshwari, Radha K. Deinococcus Mn 2+ -peptide complex: A novel approach to alphavirus vaccine development. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.05.016.
Gayen, Manoshi, Gupta, Paridhi, Morazzani, Elaine M., Gaidamakova, Elena K., Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara, Daly, Michael J., Glass, Pamela J., and Maheshwari, Radha K. 2017. "Deinococcus Mn 2+ -peptide complex: A novel approach to alphavirus vaccine development". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.05.016.
@article{osti_1360860,
title = {Deinococcus Mn 2+ -peptide complex: A novel approach to alphavirus vaccine development},
author = {Gayen, Manoshi and Gupta, Paridhi and Morazzani, Elaine M. and Gaidamakova, Elena K. and Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara and Daly, Michael J. and Glass, Pamela J. and Maheshwari, Radha K.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.05.016},
journal = {Vaccine},
number = 29,
volume = 35,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.05.016

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