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Title: Development of Microsatellite Markers for Buffalograss ( Buchloë dactyloides ; Poaceae), a Drought-Tolerant Turfgrass Alternative

Abstract

Buchloë dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm. (buffalograss; Poaceae) is a low-growing, perennial C4 grass that is a dominant component of shortgrass prairies of the North American Great Plains (Shearman et al., 2004). Beyond this significant ecosystem role, buffalograss has been widely adopted as a drought-tolerant turfgrass alternative, particularly notable as a native-species option in North America. Like many dominant Great Plains grasses, B. dactyloides comprises an autopolypoid series, including diploids (2n = 20), tetraploids, pentaploids, and hexaploids (Johnson et al., 2001). Preserving the full range of buffalograss phenotypic and genotypic diversity and utilizing this diversity for crop improvement will require an understanding of the distribution of genetic variation among cytotypes and across its large geographic range. Beyond numerous methodological advantages (Guichoux et al., 2011), microsatellites, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers,are an attractive genetic tool for studies of wide-ranging polyploid series given their codominant nature and applicability to museum-derived DNAs. Because SSR data are routinely obtainable from DNA extracted from museum tissue (Wandeler et al., 2007), these samples can be used to quickly and economically obtain comparative genotypic data from all portions of a large geographic range. Currently no buffalograss-specific SSR loci are available, as previous studies have relied on a mixturemore » of dominant and codominant loci that were designed for other taxa (Budak et al., 2004). In this study, a set of SSR loci are designed from B. dactyloides genomic sequence data. The variability of these loci are then evaluated in six populations from numerous portions of the buffalograss range.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Wichita State Univ., Wichita, KS (United States)
  2. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL)
  3. Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)
  4. Wichita State Univ., Wichita, KS (United States); Botanical Research Inst. of Texas, Fort Worth, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc., Athens, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1360814
Grant/Contract Number:
FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applications in Plant Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2168-0450
Publisher:
Botanical Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Buchloë dactyloides; Great Plains; Illumina sequencing; native turfgrass alternative; Poaceae; polyploidy; simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers

Citation Formats

Hadle, Jacob J., Konrade, Lauren A., Beasley, Rochelle R., Lance, Stacey L., Jones, Kenneth L., and Beck, James B. Development of Microsatellite Markers for Buffalograss ( Buchloë dactyloides ; Poaceae), a Drought-Tolerant Turfgrass Alternative. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3732/apps.1600033.
Hadle, Jacob J., Konrade, Lauren A., Beasley, Rochelle R., Lance, Stacey L., Jones, Kenneth L., & Beck, James B. Development of Microsatellite Markers for Buffalograss ( Buchloë dactyloides ; Poaceae), a Drought-Tolerant Turfgrass Alternative. United States. doi:10.3732/apps.1600033.
Hadle, Jacob J., Konrade, Lauren A., Beasley, Rochelle R., Lance, Stacey L., Jones, Kenneth L., and Beck, James B. 2016. "Development of Microsatellite Markers for Buffalograss ( Buchloë dactyloides ; Poaceae), a Drought-Tolerant Turfgrass Alternative". United States. doi:10.3732/apps.1600033. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1360814.
@article{osti_1360814,
title = {Development of Microsatellite Markers for Buffalograss ( Buchloë dactyloides ; Poaceae), a Drought-Tolerant Turfgrass Alternative},
author = {Hadle, Jacob J. and Konrade, Lauren A. and Beasley, Rochelle R. and Lance, Stacey L. and Jones, Kenneth L. and Beck, James B.},
abstractNote = {Buchloë dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm. (buffalograss; Poaceae) is a low-growing, perennial C4 grass that is a dominant component of shortgrass prairies of the North American Great Plains (Shearman et al., 2004). Beyond this significant ecosystem role, buffalograss has been widely adopted as a drought-tolerant turfgrass alternative, particularly notable as a native-species option in North America. Like many dominant Great Plains grasses, B. dactyloides comprises an autopolypoid series, including diploids (2n = 20), tetraploids, pentaploids, and hexaploids (Johnson et al., 2001). Preserving the full range of buffalograss phenotypic and genotypic diversity and utilizing this diversity for crop improvement will require an understanding of the distribution of genetic variation among cytotypes and across its large geographic range. Beyond numerous methodological advantages (Guichoux et al., 2011), microsatellites, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers,are an attractive genetic tool for studies of wide-ranging polyploid series given their codominant nature and applicability to museum-derived DNAs. Because SSR data are routinely obtainable from DNA extracted from museum tissue (Wandeler et al., 2007), these samples can be used to quickly and economically obtain comparative genotypic data from all portions of a large geographic range. Currently no buffalograss-specific SSR loci are available, as previous studies have relied on a mixture of dominant and codominant loci that were designed for other taxa (Budak et al., 2004). In this study, a set of SSR loci are designed from B. dactyloides genomic sequence data. The variability of these loci are then evaluated in six populations from numerous portions of the buffalograss range.},
doi = {10.3732/apps.1600033},
journal = {Applications in Plant Science},
number = 8,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

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  • The availability of high resolution genetic maps has enabled the rapid mapping of a large number of disease loci. In absence of good candidate genes, the eventual identification of the disease locus requires effective strategies for completing the positional cloning {open_quotes}end game{close_quotes}. An essential element of this exercise is the development of local high resolution genetic maps, enabling the precise localization of the minimal interval containing the targeted gene. In addition, one also requires an accurate clone map of this minimal interval. Currently, clone coverage can be obtained using YACs, but rapid development of new genetic markers or additional STSsmore » for walking or confirmation of clone order is a tedious process. Here we describe the successful application of a novel, rapid and efficient procedure, based on subtractive hybridization and PCR amplification for generating microsatellite markers on non-polymorphic STSs directly from the YACs or other large insert cloning vectors. After a single round of subtraction, the target sequences (YAC) are amplified by PCR and cloned into plasmid vectors. Several key steps have been designed to achieve efficient subtractive hybridization and to obtain preferential amplification of the target sequences. These technical steps include the design of novel adapters, PCR primers, efficient development of small insert libraries and non-radioactive screening methods. For example, using a 600 kb YAC as a target, we developed 14 new microsatellite markers. These new markers greatly facilitated genetic localization of a disease locus and allowed the accurate ordering by STS content mapping of a cloned contig spanning the interval. In addition to the utility of this approach in positional cloning, this strategy may provide an approach for filling gaps in the emerging genetic maps.« less
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