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Title: Development of Microsatellite Markers for Buffalograss ( Buchloë dactyloides ; Poaceae), a Drought-Tolerant Turfgrass Alternative

Abstract

Buchloë dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm. (buffalograss; Poaceae) is a low-growing, perennial C4 grass that is a dominant component of shortgrass prairies of the North American Great Plains (Shearman et al., 2004). Beyond this significant ecosystem role, buffalograss has been widely adopted as a drought-tolerant turfgrass alternative, particularly notable as a native-species option in North America. Like many dominant Great Plains grasses, B. dactyloides comprises an autopolypoid series, including diploids (2n = 20), tetraploids, pentaploids, and hexaploids (Johnson et al., 2001). Preserving the full range of buffalograss phenotypic and genotypic diversity and utilizing this diversity for crop improvement will require an understanding of the distribution of genetic variation among cytotypes and across its large geographic range. Beyond numerous methodological advantages (Guichoux et al., 2011), microsatellites, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers,are an attractive genetic tool for studies of wide-ranging polyploid series given their codominant nature and applicability to museum-derived DNAs. Because SSR data are routinely obtainable from DNA extracted from museum tissue (Wandeler et al., 2007), these samples can be used to quickly and economically obtain comparative genotypic data from all portions of a large geographic range. Currently no buffalograss-specific SSR loci are available, as previous studies have relied on a mixturemore » of dominant and codominant loci that were designed for other taxa (Budak et al., 2004). In this study, a set of SSR loci are designed from B. dactyloides genomic sequence data. The variability of these loci are then evaluated in six populations from numerous portions of the buffalograss range.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Wichita State Univ., Wichita, KS (United States)
  2. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL)
  3. Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)
  4. Wichita State Univ., Wichita, KS (United States); Botanical Research Inst. of Texas, Fort Worth, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc., Athens, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1360814
Grant/Contract Number:  
FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applications in Plant Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2168-0450
Publisher:
Botanical Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Buchloë dactyloides; Great Plains; Illumina sequencing; native turfgrass alternative; Poaceae; polyploidy; simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers

Citation Formats

Hadle, Jacob J., Konrade, Lauren A., Beasley, Rochelle R., Lance, Stacey L., Jones, Kenneth L., and Beck, James B. Development of Microsatellite Markers for Buffalograss ( Buchloë dactyloides ; Poaceae), a Drought-Tolerant Turfgrass Alternative. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3732/apps.1600033.
Hadle, Jacob J., Konrade, Lauren A., Beasley, Rochelle R., Lance, Stacey L., Jones, Kenneth L., & Beck, James B. Development of Microsatellite Markers for Buffalograss ( Buchloë dactyloides ; Poaceae), a Drought-Tolerant Turfgrass Alternative. United States. doi:10.3732/apps.1600033.
Hadle, Jacob J., Konrade, Lauren A., Beasley, Rochelle R., Lance, Stacey L., Jones, Kenneth L., and Beck, James B. Wed . "Development of Microsatellite Markers for Buffalograss ( Buchloë dactyloides ; Poaceae), a Drought-Tolerant Turfgrass Alternative". United States. doi:10.3732/apps.1600033. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1360814.
@article{osti_1360814,
title = {Development of Microsatellite Markers for Buffalograss ( Buchloë dactyloides ; Poaceae), a Drought-Tolerant Turfgrass Alternative},
author = {Hadle, Jacob J. and Konrade, Lauren A. and Beasley, Rochelle R. and Lance, Stacey L. and Jones, Kenneth L. and Beck, James B.},
abstractNote = {Buchloë dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm. (buffalograss; Poaceae) is a low-growing, perennial C4 grass that is a dominant component of shortgrass prairies of the North American Great Plains (Shearman et al., 2004). Beyond this significant ecosystem role, buffalograss has been widely adopted as a drought-tolerant turfgrass alternative, particularly notable as a native-species option in North America. Like many dominant Great Plains grasses, B. dactyloides comprises an autopolypoid series, including diploids (2n = 20), tetraploids, pentaploids, and hexaploids (Johnson et al., 2001). Preserving the full range of buffalograss phenotypic and genotypic diversity and utilizing this diversity for crop improvement will require an understanding of the distribution of genetic variation among cytotypes and across its large geographic range. Beyond numerous methodological advantages (Guichoux et al., 2011), microsatellites, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers,are an attractive genetic tool for studies of wide-ranging polyploid series given their codominant nature and applicability to museum-derived DNAs. Because SSR data are routinely obtainable from DNA extracted from museum tissue (Wandeler et al., 2007), these samples can be used to quickly and economically obtain comparative genotypic data from all portions of a large geographic range. Currently no buffalograss-specific SSR loci are available, as previous studies have relied on a mixture of dominant and codominant loci that were designed for other taxa (Budak et al., 2004). In this study, a set of SSR loci are designed from B. dactyloides genomic sequence data. The variability of these loci are then evaluated in six populations from numerous portions of the buffalograss range.},
doi = {10.3732/apps.1600033},
journal = {Applications in Plant Science},
number = 8,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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