skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Final Report: System Reliability Model for Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Luminaires

Abstract

The primary objectives of this project was to develop and validate reliability models and accelerated stress testing (AST) methodologies for predicting the lifetime of integrated SSL luminaires. This study examined the likely failure modes for SSL luminaires including abrupt failure, excessive lumen depreciation, unacceptable color shifts, and increased power consumption. Data on the relative distribution of these failure modes were acquired through extensive accelerated stress tests and combined with industry data and other source of information on LED lighting. This data was compiled and utilized to build models of the aging behavior of key luminaire optical and electrical components.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B)
OSTI Identifier:
1360770
Report Number(s):
DOE-RTI-05124-1
DOE Contract Number:
EE0005124
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; SSL; LED; reliability

Citation Formats

Davis, J. Lynn. Final Report: System Reliability Model for Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Luminaires. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1360770.
Davis, J. Lynn. Final Report: System Reliability Model for Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Luminaires. United States. doi:10.2172/1360770.
Davis, J. Lynn. Wed . "Final Report: System Reliability Model for Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Luminaires". United States. doi:10.2172/1360770. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1360770.
@article{osti_1360770,
title = {Final Report: System Reliability Model for Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Luminaires},
author = {Davis, J. Lynn},
abstractNote = {The primary objectives of this project was to develop and validate reliability models and accelerated stress testing (AST) methodologies for predicting the lifetime of integrated SSL luminaires. This study examined the likely failure modes for SSL luminaires including abrupt failure, excessive lumen depreciation, unacceptable color shifts, and increased power consumption. Data on the relative distribution of these failure modes were acquired through extensive accelerated stress tests and combined with industry data and other source of information on LED lighting. This data was compiled and utilized to build models of the aging behavior of key luminaire optical and electrical components.},
doi = {10.2172/1360770},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed May 31 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • This project developed an integrated substrate which organic light emitting diode (OLED) panel developers could employ the integrated substrate to fabricate OLED devices with performance and projected cost meeting the MYPP targets of the Solid State Lighting Program of the Department of Energy. The project optimized the composition and processing conditions of the integrated substrate for OLED light extraction efficiency and overall performance. The process was further developed for scale up to a low-cost process and fabrication of prototype samples. The encapsulation of flexible OLEDs based on this integrated substrate was also investigated using commercial flexible barrier films.
  • The final report from the U.S. Department of Energy 2009 Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Workshops.
  • This SAND report is the final report on Sandia's Grand Challenge LDRD Project 27328, 'A Revolution in Lighting -- Building the Science and Technology Base for Ultra-Efficient Solid-state Lighting.' This project, which for brevity we refer to as the SSL GCLDRD, is considered one of Sandia's most successful GCLDRDs. As a result, this report reviews not only technical highlights, but also the genesis of the idea for Solid-state Lighting (SSL), the initiation of the SSL GCLDRD, and the goals, scope, success metrics, and evolution of the SSL GCLDRD over the course of its life. One way in which the SSLmore » GCLDRD was different from other GCLDRDs was that it coincided with a larger effort by the SSL community - primarily industrial companies investing in SSL, but also universities, trade organizations, and other Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories - to support a national initiative in SSL R&D. Sandia was a major player in publicizing the tremendous energy savings potential of SSL, and in helping to develop, unify and support community consensus for such an initiative. Hence, our activities in this area, discussed in Chapter 6, were substantial: white papers; SSL technology workshops and roadmaps; support for the Optoelectronics Industry Development Association (OIDA), DOE and Senator Bingaman's office; extensive public relations and media activities; and a worldwide SSL community website. Many science and technology advances and breakthroughs were also enabled under this GCLDRD, resulting in: 55 publications; 124 presentations; 10 book chapters and reports; 5 U.S. patent applications including 1 already issued; and 14 patent disclosures not yet applied for. Twenty-six invited talks were given, at prestigious venues such as the American Physical Society Meeting, the Materials Research Society Meeting, the AVS International Symposium, and the Electrochemical Society Meeting. This report contains a summary of these science and technology advances and breakthroughs, with Chapters 1-5 devoted to the five technical task areas: 1 Fundamental Materials Physics; 2 111-Nitride Growth Chemistry and Substrate Physics; 3 111-Nitride MOCVD Reactor Design and In-Situ Monitoring; 4 Advanced Light-Emitting Devices; and 5 Phosphors and Encapsulants. Chapter 7 (Appendix A) contains a listing of publications, presentations, and patents. Finally, the SSL GCLDRD resulted in numerous actual and pending follow-on programs for Sandia, including multiple grants from DOE and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) with SSL companies. Many of these follow-on programs arose out of contacts developed through our External Advisory Committee (EAC). In h s and other ways, the EAC played a very important role. Chapter 8 (Appendix B) contains the full (unedited) text of the EAC reviews that were held periodically during the course of the project.« less
  • The innovation proposed in this grant is to demonstrate a novel internal light extraction (ILE) design that can maximize the energy efficiency of Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) lighting devices without negatively impacting the device voltage, efficacy or angular color dependences. Even though, OLEDs have unique features compared to its inorganic counterparts, LEDs, in terms of technology development and market readiness levels, it still lags LEDs by several years. The main challenges as identified in the National Research Council’s 2013 Assessment on Solid State Lighting, are the cost of the materials and the low light extraction efficacy [1]. Improving themore » light extraction will improve both the $/Klm and lm/W, two important metrics DOE uses to measure the cost effectiveness of a light source.« less
  • The goal of this one year LDRD was to improve the overall efficiency of InGaN LEDs by improving the extraction of light from the semiconductor chip. InGaN LEDs are currently the most promising technology for producing high efficiency blue and green semiconductor light emitters. Improving the efficiency of InGaN LEDs will enable a more rapid adoption of semiconductor based lighting. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop photonic structures to improve light extraction from nitride-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). While many advanced device geometries were considered for this work, we focused on the use of a photonic crystal for improvedmore » light extraction. Although resonant cavity LEDs and other advanced structures certainly have the potential to improve light extraction, the photonic crystal approach showed the most promise in the early stages of this short program. The photonic crystal (PX)-LED developed here incorporates a two dimensional photonic crystal, or photonic lattice, into a nitride-based LED. The dimensions of the photonic crystal are selected such that there are very few or no optical modes in the plane of the LED ('lateral' modes). This will reduce or eliminate any radiation in the lateral direction so that the majority of the LED radiation will be in vertical modes that escape the semiconductor, which will improve the light-extraction efficiency. PX-LEDs were fabricated using a range of hole diameters and lattice constants and compared to control LEDs without a photonic crystal. The far field patterns from the PX-LEDs were dramatically modified by the presence of the photonic crystal. An increase in LED brightness of 1.75X was observed for light measured into a 40 degree emission cone with a total increase in power of 1.5X for an unencapsulated LED.« less