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Title: Allowable Stresses For Use in Dynamic Analysis of PF-4 Fire Suppression System Piping

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a limited test program performed on samples of fittings removed from the PF-4 fire suppression system and to present recommendations for allowable stresses to be used in subsequent piping analysis.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1360690
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24323
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Menefee, Maia Catherine, and Salmon, Michael W. Allowable Stresses For Use in Dynamic Analysis of PF-4 Fire Suppression System Piping. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1360690.
Menefee, Maia Catherine, & Salmon, Michael W. Allowable Stresses For Use in Dynamic Analysis of PF-4 Fire Suppression System Piping. United States. doi:10.2172/1360690.
Menefee, Maia Catherine, and Salmon, Michael W. 2017. "Allowable Stresses For Use in Dynamic Analysis of PF-4 Fire Suppression System Piping". United States. doi:10.2172/1360690. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1360690.
@article{osti_1360690,
title = {Allowable Stresses For Use in Dynamic Analysis of PF-4 Fire Suppression System Piping},
author = {Menefee, Maia Catherine and Salmon, Michael W.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a limited test program performed on samples of fittings removed from the PF-4 fire suppression system and to present recommendations for allowable stresses to be used in subsequent piping analysis.},
doi = {10.2172/1360690},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Technical Report:

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