skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Model-Based Extracted Water Desalination System for Carbon Sequestration

Abstract

Over the last 1.5 years, GE Global Research and Pennsylvania State University defined a model-based, scalable, and multi-stage extracted water desalination system that yields clean water, concentrated brine, and, optionally, salt. The team explored saline brines that ranged across the expected range for extracted water for carbon sequestration reservoirs (40,000 up to 220,000 ppm total dissolved solids, TDS). In addition, the validated the system performance at pilot scale with field-sourced water using GE’s pre-pilot and lab facilities. This project encompassed four principal tasks, in addition to Project Management and Planning: 1) identify a deep saline formation carbon sequestration site and a partner that are suitable for supplying extracted water; 2) conduct a techno-economic assessment and down-selection of pre-treatment and desalination technologies to identify a cost-effective system for extracted water recovery; 3) validate the downselected processes at the lab/pre-pilot scale; and 4) define the scope of the pilot desalination project. Highlights from each task are described below: Deep saline formation characterization The deep saline formations associated with the five DOE NETL 1260 Phase 1 projects were characterized with respect to their mineralogy and formation water composition. Sources of high TDS feed water other than extracted water were explored for high TDSmore » desalination applications, including unconventional oil and gas and seawater reverse osmosis concentrate. Technoeconomic analysis of desalination technologies Techno-economic evaluations of alternate brine concentration technologies, including humidification-dehumidification (HDH), membrane distillation (MD), forward osmosis (FO), turboexpander-freeze, solvent extraction and high pressure reverse osmosis (HPRO), were conducted. These technologies were evaluated against conventional falling film-mechanical vapor recompression (FF-MVR) as a baseline desalination process. Furthermore, a quality function deployment (QFD) method was used to compare alternate high TDS desalination technologies to FF-MVR. High pressure reverse osmosis was found to a be a promising alternative desalination technology. A deep-dive technoeconomic analysis of HPRO was performed, including Capex and Opex estimates, for seawater RO (SWRO). Additionally, two additional cases were explored: 1) a comparison of a SWRO plus HPRO system to the option of doubling the size of a standard seawater RO system to achieve the same total pure water recovery rate; and 2) a flue gas desulfurization wastewater treatment zero-liquid discharge (ZLD) application, where preconcentration with RO (SWRO or SWRO + HPRO) before evaporation and crystallization was compared to FF-MVR and crystallization technologies without RO preconcentration. Pre-pilot process validation Pre-pilot-scale tests were conducted using field production water to validate key process steps for extracted water pretreatment. Approximately 5,000 gallons of field produced water was processed through, microfiltration, ultrafiltration, and steam regenerable sorbent operations. Smaller quantities were processed through microclarification. In addition, analytical methods (purge-and-trap gas chromatography and Hach TOC analytical methods) were validated. Lab-scale HPRO elements were constructed and tested at high pressures, to identify and mitigate technical risks of the technology. Lastly, improvements in RO membrane materials were identified as the necessary next step to achieve further improvement in element performance at high pressure. Scope of Field Pilot A field pilot for extracted water pretreatment was designed.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. General Electric Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States)
  2. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
General Electric Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1360630
Report Number(s):
DOE-GE-FE0026308
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0026308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; extracted water treatment; desalination; reverse osmosis; carbon capture and sequestration; pretreatment; water reuse

Citation Formats

Dees, Elizabeth M., Moore, David Roger, Li, Li, and Kumar, Manish. Model-Based Extracted Water Desalination System for Carbon Sequestration. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1360630.
Dees, Elizabeth M., Moore, David Roger, Li, Li, & Kumar, Manish. Model-Based Extracted Water Desalination System for Carbon Sequestration. United States. doi:10.2172/1360630.
Dees, Elizabeth M., Moore, David Roger, Li, Li, and Kumar, Manish. Sun . "Model-Based Extracted Water Desalination System for Carbon Sequestration". United States. doi:10.2172/1360630. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1360630.
@article{osti_1360630,
title = {Model-Based Extracted Water Desalination System for Carbon Sequestration},
author = {Dees, Elizabeth M. and Moore, David Roger and Li, Li and Kumar, Manish},
abstractNote = {Over the last 1.5 years, GE Global Research and Pennsylvania State University defined a model-based, scalable, and multi-stage extracted water desalination system that yields clean water, concentrated brine, and, optionally, salt. The team explored saline brines that ranged across the expected range for extracted water for carbon sequestration reservoirs (40,000 up to 220,000 ppm total dissolved solids, TDS). In addition, the validated the system performance at pilot scale with field-sourced water using GE’s pre-pilot and lab facilities. This project encompassed four principal tasks, in addition to Project Management and Planning: 1) identify a deep saline formation carbon sequestration site and a partner that are suitable for supplying extracted water; 2) conduct a techno-economic assessment and down-selection of pre-treatment and desalination technologies to identify a cost-effective system for extracted water recovery; 3) validate the downselected processes at the lab/pre-pilot scale; and 4) define the scope of the pilot desalination project. Highlights from each task are described below: Deep saline formation characterization The deep saline formations associated with the five DOE NETL 1260 Phase 1 projects were characterized with respect to their mineralogy and formation water composition. Sources of high TDS feed water other than extracted water were explored for high TDS desalination applications, including unconventional oil and gas and seawater reverse osmosis concentrate. Technoeconomic analysis of desalination technologies Techno-economic evaluations of alternate brine concentration technologies, including humidification-dehumidification (HDH), membrane distillation (MD), forward osmosis (FO), turboexpander-freeze, solvent extraction and high pressure reverse osmosis (HPRO), were conducted. These technologies were evaluated against conventional falling film-mechanical vapor recompression (FF-MVR) as a baseline desalination process. Furthermore, a quality function deployment (QFD) method was used to compare alternate high TDS desalination technologies to FF-MVR. High pressure reverse osmosis was found to a be a promising alternative desalination technology. A deep-dive technoeconomic analysis of HPRO was performed, including Capex and Opex estimates, for seawater RO (SWRO). Additionally, two additional cases were explored: 1) a comparison of a SWRO plus HPRO system to the option of doubling the size of a standard seawater RO system to achieve the same total pure water recovery rate; and 2) a flue gas desulfurization wastewater treatment zero-liquid discharge (ZLD) application, where preconcentration with RO (SWRO or SWRO + HPRO) before evaporation and crystallization was compared to FF-MVR and crystallization technologies without RO preconcentration. Pre-pilot process validation Pre-pilot-scale tests were conducted using field production water to validate key process steps for extracted water pretreatment. Approximately 5,000 gallons of field produced water was processed through, microfiltration, ultrafiltration, and steam regenerable sorbent operations. Smaller quantities were processed through microclarification. In addition, analytical methods (purge-and-trap gas chromatography and Hach TOC analytical methods) were validated. Lab-scale HPRO elements were constructed and tested at high pressures, to identify and mitigate technical risks of the technology. Lastly, improvements in RO membrane materials were identified as the necessary next step to achieve further improvement in element performance at high pressure. Scope of Field Pilot A field pilot for extracted water pretreatment was designed.},
doi = {10.2172/1360630},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun May 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun May 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: