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Title: Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

Abstract

The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. In conclusion, the pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24); USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1360156
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-16543
Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748; RSINAK
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Kim, J. B., Göde, S., and Glenzer, S. H.. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4961089.
Kim, J. B., Göde, S., & Glenzer, S. H.. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961089.
Kim, J. B., Göde, S., and Glenzer, S. H.. 2016. "Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4961089. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1360156.
@article{osti_1360156,
title = {Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments},
author = {Kim, J. B. and Göde, S. and Glenzer, S. H.},
abstractNote = {The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. In conclusion, the pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4961089},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 11,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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