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Title: Systematically evaluating read-across prediction and performance using a local validity approach characterized by chemical structure and bioactivity information

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ORCiD logo; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1359974
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 79; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-03 21:48:31; Journal ID: ISSN 0273-2300
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Shah, Imran, Liu, Jie, Judson, Richard S., Thomas, Russell S., and Patlewicz, Grace. Systematically evaluating read-across prediction and performance using a local validity approach characterized by chemical structure and bioactivity information. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.yrtph.2016.05.008.
Shah, Imran, Liu, Jie, Judson, Richard S., Thomas, Russell S., & Patlewicz, Grace. Systematically evaluating read-across prediction and performance using a local validity approach characterized by chemical structure and bioactivity information. United States. doi:10.1016/j.yrtph.2016.05.008.
Shah, Imran, Liu, Jie, Judson, Richard S., Thomas, Russell S., and Patlewicz, Grace. 2016. "Systematically evaluating read-across prediction and performance using a local validity approach characterized by chemical structure and bioactivity information". United States. doi:10.1016/j.yrtph.2016.05.008.
@article{osti_1359974,
title = {Systematically evaluating read-across prediction and performance using a local validity approach characterized by chemical structure and bioactivity information},
author = {Shah, Imran and Liu, Jie and Judson, Richard S. and Thomas, Russell S. and Patlewicz, Grace},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.yrtph.2016.05.008},
journal = {Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology},
number = C,
volume = 79,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.yrtph.2016.05.008

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