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Title: Exothermic behaviors of mechanically abused lithium-ion batteries with dibenzylamine

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E)
OSTI Identifier:
1359479
Grant/Contract Number:
AR0000396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Power Sources
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 326; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 09:02:58; Journal ID: ISSN 0378-7753
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Shi, Yang, Noelle, Daniel J., Wang, Meng, Le, Anh V., Yoon, Hyojung, Zhang, Minghao, Meng, Ying Shirley, and Qiao, Yu. Exothermic behaviors of mechanically abused lithium-ion batteries with dibenzylamine. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2016.07.034.
Shi, Yang, Noelle, Daniel J., Wang, Meng, Le, Anh V., Yoon, Hyojung, Zhang, Minghao, Meng, Ying Shirley, & Qiao, Yu. Exothermic behaviors of mechanically abused lithium-ion batteries with dibenzylamine. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2016.07.034.
Shi, Yang, Noelle, Daniel J., Wang, Meng, Le, Anh V., Yoon, Hyojung, Zhang, Minghao, Meng, Ying Shirley, and Qiao, Yu. 2016. "Exothermic behaviors of mechanically abused lithium-ion batteries with dibenzylamine". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jpowsour.2016.07.034.
@article{osti_1359479,
title = {Exothermic behaviors of mechanically abused lithium-ion batteries with dibenzylamine},
author = {Shi, Yang and Noelle, Daniel J. and Wang, Meng and Le, Anh V. and Yoon, Hyojung and Zhang, Minghao and Meng, Ying Shirley and Qiao, Yu},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jpowsour.2016.07.034},
journal = {Journal of Power Sources},
number = C,
volume = 326,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2016.07.034

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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