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Title: Determination of mineral dissolution regimes using flow-through time-resolved analysis (FT-TRA) and numerical simulation

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1358933
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Chemical Geology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 430; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-03 21:35:10; Journal ID: ISSN 0009-2541
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

De Baere, Bart, Molins, Sergi, Mayer, K. Ulrich, and François, Roger. Determination of mineral dissolution regimes using flow-through time-resolved analysis (FT-TRA) and numerical simulation. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.chemgeo.2016.03.014.
De Baere, Bart, Molins, Sergi, Mayer, K. Ulrich, & François, Roger. Determination of mineral dissolution regimes using flow-through time-resolved analysis (FT-TRA) and numerical simulation. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.chemgeo.2016.03.014.
De Baere, Bart, Molins, Sergi, Mayer, K. Ulrich, and François, Roger. 2016. "Determination of mineral dissolution regimes using flow-through time-resolved analysis (FT-TRA) and numerical simulation". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.chemgeo.2016.03.014.
@article{osti_1358933,
title = {Determination of mineral dissolution regimes using flow-through time-resolved analysis (FT-TRA) and numerical simulation},
author = {De Baere, Bart and Molins, Sergi and Mayer, K. Ulrich and François, Roger},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.chemgeo.2016.03.014},
journal = {Chemical Geology},
number = C,
volume = 430,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.chemgeo.2016.03.014

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • A non-metallic flow-through reaction cell is described, designed for in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction coupled with stable isotope analysis. The experimental setup allows the correlation of Cu isotope fractionation with changes in crystal structure during copper sulfide dissolution. This flow-through cell can be applied to many classes of fluid-mineral reactions that involve dissolution or ion exchange.
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