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Title: Review of the impacts of leaking CO 2 gas and brine on groundwater quality

Abstract

This review paper provides a synthetic view of the existing knowledge and summarizes data and findings of the recent literature on the subject of the potential leaking of CO2 from the deep subsurface storage reservoirs and the effects on aquifer quality. New ideas and concepts are developed and insights are also provided. The objectives of this paper are to: 1) present and discuss potential risks for groundwater degradation due to CO2 gas and brine exposure; 2) identify the set of geochemical data required to assess and predict aquifer responses to CO2 and brine leakage. Specifically, this paper will discuss the following issues: 1) Aquifer responses (such as changes in aqueous phase/groundwater chemical composition; changes in solid phase chemistry and mineralogy; changes in the extent and rate of reactions and processes and possible establishment of a new network of reactions and processes affecting or controlling overall mobility of major, minor, and trace elements; development of conceptual and reduced order models (ROMs) to describe and predict aquifer responses); 2) The degree of impact such as significant or insignificant changes in pH and major, minor, and trace element release that depend on the following controlling variables; the effect of leaking plume characteristics (gasmore » composition, pure CO2 and/or CO2 -CH4 -H2S mixtures and brine concentration and composition (trace metals); aquifer properties [such as initial aqueous phase conditions and mineralogy: minerals controlling sediments’ response (e.g., calcite, Si bearing minerals, etc.)]; overview of relevant hydrogeological and geochemical processes related to the impact of CO2 gas and brine on groundwater quality; the fate of the elements released from sediments or transported with brine (such as precipitation/incorporation into minerals (calcite and other minerals), adsorption, electron transfer reactions, the role of natural attenuation; whether or not the release of metals following exposure to CO2 harmful (risk assessment).« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1358496
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-119041
Journal ID: ISSN 0012-8252; AA7020000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Earth-Science Reviews
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 169; Journal ID: ISSN 0012-8252
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Qafoku, Nikolla P., Lawter, Amanda R., Bacon, Diana H., Zheng, Liange, Kyle, Jennifer, and Brown, Christopher F. Review of the impacts of leaking CO 2 gas and brine on groundwater quality. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.04.010.
Qafoku, Nikolla P., Lawter, Amanda R., Bacon, Diana H., Zheng, Liange, Kyle, Jennifer, & Brown, Christopher F. Review of the impacts of leaking CO 2 gas and brine on groundwater quality. United States. doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.04.010.
Qafoku, Nikolla P., Lawter, Amanda R., Bacon, Diana H., Zheng, Liange, Kyle, Jennifer, and Brown, Christopher F. Thu . "Review of the impacts of leaking CO 2 gas and brine on groundwater quality". United States. doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.04.010.
@article{osti_1358496,
title = {Review of the impacts of leaking CO 2 gas and brine on groundwater quality},
author = {Qafoku, Nikolla P. and Lawter, Amanda R. and Bacon, Diana H. and Zheng, Liange and Kyle, Jennifer and Brown, Christopher F.},
abstractNote = {This review paper provides a synthetic view of the existing knowledge and summarizes data and findings of the recent literature on the subject of the potential leaking of CO2 from the deep subsurface storage reservoirs and the effects on aquifer quality. New ideas and concepts are developed and insights are also provided. The objectives of this paper are to: 1) present and discuss potential risks for groundwater degradation due to CO2 gas and brine exposure; 2) identify the set of geochemical data required to assess and predict aquifer responses to CO2 and brine leakage. Specifically, this paper will discuss the following issues: 1) Aquifer responses (such as changes in aqueous phase/groundwater chemical composition; changes in solid phase chemistry and mineralogy; changes in the extent and rate of reactions and processes and possible establishment of a new network of reactions and processes affecting or controlling overall mobility of major, minor, and trace elements; development of conceptual and reduced order models (ROMs) to describe and predict aquifer responses); 2) The degree of impact such as significant or insignificant changes in pH and major, minor, and trace element release that depend on the following controlling variables; the effect of leaking plume characteristics (gas composition, pure CO2 and/or CO2 -CH4 -H2S mixtures and brine concentration and composition (trace metals); aquifer properties [such as initial aqueous phase conditions and mineralogy: minerals controlling sediments’ response (e.g., calcite, Si bearing minerals, etc.)]; overview of relevant hydrogeological and geochemical processes related to the impact of CO2 gas and brine on groundwater quality; the fate of the elements released from sediments or transported with brine (such as precipitation/incorporation into minerals (calcite and other minerals), adsorption, electron transfer reactions, the role of natural attenuation; whether or not the release of metals following exposure to CO2 harmful (risk assessment).},
doi = {10.1016/j.earscirev.2017.04.010},
journal = {Earth-Science Reviews},
issn = {0012-8252},
number = ,
volume = 169,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {6}
}