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Title: FLOW TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF THE FSP-1 EXPERIMENT

Abstract

The U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversions fuel development team is focused on developing and qualifying the uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy monolithic fuel to support conversion of domestic research reactors to low enriched uranium. Several previous irradiations have demonstrated the favorable behavior of the monolithic fuel. The Full Scale Plate 1 (FSP-1) fuel plate experiment will be irradiated in the northeast (NE) flux trap of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This fueled experiment contains six aluminum-clad fuel plates consisting of monolithic U-Mo fuel meat. Flow testing experimentation and hydraulic analysis have been performed on the FSP-1 experiment to be irradiated in the ATR at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A flow test experiment mockup of the FSP-1 experiment was completed at Oregon State University. Results of several flow test experiments are compared with analyses. This paper reports and shows hydraulic analyses are nearly identical to the flow test results. A water velocity of 14.0 meters per second is targeted between the fuel plates. Comparisons between FSP-1 measurements and this target will be discussed. This flow rate dominates the flow characteristics of the experiment and model. Separate branch flows have minimal effect on the overall experiment. A square flow orifice was placedmore » to control the flowrate through the experiment. Four different orifices were tested. A flow versus delta P curve for each orifice is reported herein. Fuel plates with depleted uranium in the fuel meat zone were used in one of the flow tests. This test was performed to evaluate flow test vibration with actual fuel meat densities and reported herein. Fuel plate deformation tests were also performed and reported.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1358409
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-16-40594
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ASME Power and Energy Conference & Exposition, Charlotte, North Carolina, June 26–30, 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; Flow Test Experiment; Nuclear Fuel

Citation Formats

Hawkes, Grant L., Jones, Warren F., Marcum, Wade, Weiss, Aaron, and Howard, Trevor. FLOW TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF THE FSP-1 EXPERIMENT. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Hawkes, Grant L., Jones, Warren F., Marcum, Wade, Weiss, Aaron, & Howard, Trevor. FLOW TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF THE FSP-1 EXPERIMENT. United States.
Hawkes, Grant L., Jones, Warren F., Marcum, Wade, Weiss, Aaron, and Howard, Trevor. 2017. "FLOW TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF THE FSP-1 EXPERIMENT". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1358409.
@article{osti_1358409,
title = {FLOW TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF THE FSP-1 EXPERIMENT},
author = {Hawkes, Grant L. and Jones, Warren F. and Marcum, Wade and Weiss, Aaron and Howard, Trevor},
abstractNote = {The U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversions fuel development team is focused on developing and qualifying the uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy monolithic fuel to support conversion of domestic research reactors to low enriched uranium. Several previous irradiations have demonstrated the favorable behavior of the monolithic fuel. The Full Scale Plate 1 (FSP-1) fuel plate experiment will be irradiated in the northeast (NE) flux trap of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This fueled experiment contains six aluminum-clad fuel plates consisting of monolithic U-Mo fuel meat. Flow testing experimentation and hydraulic analysis have been performed on the FSP-1 experiment to be irradiated in the ATR at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A flow test experiment mockup of the FSP-1 experiment was completed at Oregon State University. Results of several flow test experiments are compared with analyses. This paper reports and shows hydraulic analyses are nearly identical to the flow test results. A water velocity of 14.0 meters per second is targeted between the fuel plates. Comparisons between FSP-1 measurements and this target will be discussed. This flow rate dominates the flow characteristics of the experiment and model. Separate branch flows have minimal effect on the overall experiment. A square flow orifice was placed to control the flowrate through the experiment. Four different orifices were tested. A flow versus delta P curve for each orifice is reported herein. Fuel plates with depleted uranium in the fuel meat zone were used in one of the flow tests. This test was performed to evaluate flow test vibration with actual fuel meat densities and reported herein. Fuel plate deformation tests were also performed and reported.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

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