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Title: Implementing Computer-Based Procedures: Thinking Outside the Paper Margins

Abstract

In the past year there has been increased interest from the nuclear industry in adopting the use of electronic work packages and computer-based procedures (CBPs) in the field. The goal is to incorporate the use of technology in order to meet the Nuclear Promise requirements of reducing costs and improve efficiency and decrease human error rates of plant operations. Researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been investigating the benefits an electronic work package system and specifically CBPs would have over current paper-based procedure practices. There are several classifications of CBPs ranging from a straight copy of the paper-based procedure in PDF format to a more intelligent dynamic CBP. A CBP system offers a vast variety of improvements, such as context driven job aids, integrated human performance tools (e.g., placekeeping and correct component verification), and dynamic step presentation. The latter means that the CBP system could only display relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. The improvements can lead to reduction of the worker’s workload and human error by allowing the work to focus on the task at hand more. A team of human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory studied and developedmore » design concepts for CBPs for field workers between 2012 and 2016. The focus of the research was to present information in a procedure in a manner that leveraged the dynamic and computational capabilities of a handheld device allowing the worker to focus more on the task at hand than on the administrative processes currently applied when conducting work in the plant. As a part of the research the team identified type of work, instructions, and scenarios where the transition to a dynamic CBP system might not be as beneficial as it would for other types of work in the plant. In most cases the decision to use a dynamic CBP system and utilize the dynamic capabilities gained will be beneficial to the worker. However, tasks that are reliant on the skill of the craft or have a short set of instructions may not provide a way or even need to utilize all the advanced capabilities in a dynamic CBP system. Therefore, a hybrid CBP system that could handle all the classifications of a CBP would be the best solution to take advantage of all that a CBP system offers. The implementation of a CBP system does not automatically improve the quality of procedures. Utilities should look into why each procedure is written the way it currently is on paper. Utilities should take the time before implementation to review, standardize format and update current procedures. Implementation of a CBP system can be a time to break out of traditional procedure writing processes and create new processes and procedures that take advantage of the capabilities a CBP system. This paper will summarize the research on CBPs and provide suggestions to take into consideration when implementing a CBP system.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1358399
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-16-40074
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 10th International Embedded Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control & Human-Machine Interface Technologies, San Francisco, CA, June 11–15, 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; computer-based procedures; human performance improvement

Citation Formats

Oxstrand, Johanna, and Bly, Aaron. Implementing Computer-Based Procedures: Thinking Outside the Paper Margins. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Oxstrand, Johanna, & Bly, Aaron. Implementing Computer-Based Procedures: Thinking Outside the Paper Margins. United States.
Oxstrand, Johanna, and Bly, Aaron. Thu . "Implementing Computer-Based Procedures: Thinking Outside the Paper Margins". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1358399.
@article{osti_1358399,
title = {Implementing Computer-Based Procedures: Thinking Outside the Paper Margins},
author = {Oxstrand, Johanna and Bly, Aaron},
abstractNote = {In the past year there has been increased interest from the nuclear industry in adopting the use of electronic work packages and computer-based procedures (CBPs) in the field. The goal is to incorporate the use of technology in order to meet the Nuclear Promise requirements of reducing costs and improve efficiency and decrease human error rates of plant operations. Researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been investigating the benefits an electronic work package system and specifically CBPs would have over current paper-based procedure practices. There are several classifications of CBPs ranging from a straight copy of the paper-based procedure in PDF format to a more intelligent dynamic CBP. A CBP system offers a vast variety of improvements, such as context driven job aids, integrated human performance tools (e.g., placekeeping and correct component verification), and dynamic step presentation. The latter means that the CBP system could only display relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. The improvements can lead to reduction of the worker’s workload and human error by allowing the work to focus on the task at hand more. A team of human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory studied and developed design concepts for CBPs for field workers between 2012 and 2016. The focus of the research was to present information in a procedure in a manner that leveraged the dynamic and computational capabilities of a handheld device allowing the worker to focus more on the task at hand than on the administrative processes currently applied when conducting work in the plant. As a part of the research the team identified type of work, instructions, and scenarios where the transition to a dynamic CBP system might not be as beneficial as it would for other types of work in the plant. In most cases the decision to use a dynamic CBP system and utilize the dynamic capabilities gained will be beneficial to the worker. However, tasks that are reliant on the skill of the craft or have a short set of instructions may not provide a way or even need to utilize all the advanced capabilities in a dynamic CBP system. Therefore, a hybrid CBP system that could handle all the classifications of a CBP would be the best solution to take advantage of all that a CBP system offers. The implementation of a CBP system does not automatically improve the quality of procedures. Utilities should look into why each procedure is written the way it currently is on paper. Utilities should take the time before implementation to review, standardize format and update current procedures. Implementation of a CBP system can be a time to break out of traditional procedure writing processes and create new processes and procedures that take advantage of the capabilities a CBP system. This paper will summarize the research on CBPs and provide suggestions to take into consideration when implementing a CBP system.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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  • The windows based computer program for gasket calculation was presented. C++ computer language was used. On the basis of experimental results and data sets available in the literature and calculated with the help of FSA and PVRC method, the assembly parameters were determined. The result is DONIT TESNITI Diskette, a smart tool to select gaskets on the basis of service conditions and tightness requirements.
  • Most activities that involve human interaction with systems in a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. Traditionally, the use of procedures has been a paper-based process that supports safe operation of the nuclear power industry. However, the nuclear industry is constantly trying to find ways to decrease the human error rate, especially the human errors associated with procedure use. Advances in digital technology make computer-based procedures (CBPs) a valid option that provides further enhancement of safety by improving human performance related to procedure use. The transition from paper-based procedures (PBPs) to CBPs creates a need for a computer-based proceduremore » system (CBPS). A CBPS needs to have the ability to perform logical operations in order to adjust to the inputs received from either users or real time data from plant status databases. Without the ability for logical operations the procedure is just an electronic copy of the paper-based procedure. In order to provide the CBPS with the information it needs to display the procedure steps to the user, special care is needed in the format used to deliver all data and instructions to create the steps. The procedure should be broken down into basic elements and formatted in a standard method for the CBPS. One way to build the underlying data architecture is to use an Extensible Markup Language (XML) schema, which utilizes basic elements to build each step in the smart procedure. The attributes of each step will determine the type of functionality that the system will generate for that step. The CBPS will provide the context for the step to deliver referential information, request a decision, or accept input from the user. The XML schema needs to provide all data necessary for the system to accurately perform each step without the need for the procedure writer to reprogram the CBPS. The research team at the Idaho National Laboratory has developed a prototype CBPS for field workers as well as the underlying data structure for such CBPS. The objective of the research effort is to develop guidance on how to design both the user interface and the underlying schema. This paper will describe the result and insights gained from the research activities conducted to date.« less
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  • The Idaho National Laboratory and participants from the U.S. nuclear industry are collaborating on a research effort aimed to augment the existing guidance on computer-based procedure (CBP) design with specific guidance on how to design CBP user interfaces such that they support procedure execution in ways that exceed the capabilities of paper-based procedures (PBPs) without introducing new errors. Researchers are employing an iterative process where the human factors issues and interface design principles related to CBP usage are systematically addressed and evaluated in realistic settings. This paper describes the process of developing a CBP prototype and the two studies conductedmore » to evaluate the prototype. The results indicate that CBPs may improve performance by reducing errors, but may increase the time it takes to complete procedural tasks.« less