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Title: Change in Brooklyn and Queens: How New York?s Reforming the Energy Vision Program and Con Edison Are Reshaping Electric Distribution Planning

Abstract

The New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens are undergoing a period of gentrification, infrastructure rebuilding, new construction, and load growth not experienced in decades. Significant numbers of residents are moving in, and structures that had been abandoned or were in disrepair are being refurbished and modernized to accommodate the burgeoning population. Homes, businesses, and industries are reviving areas long in decline, and Brooklyn's growth has made it the nation's fourth most populous city, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1358332
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5D00-68535
Journal ID: ISSN 1540-7977
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Power & Energy Magazine; Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; substations; power system planing; urban areas; power system reliability; batteries; electricity supply industry; power grids; distributed processing

Citation Formats

Coddington, Michael, Sciano, Damian, and Fuller, Jason. Change in Brooklyn and Queens: How New York?s Reforming the Energy Vision Program and Con Edison Are Reshaping Electric Distribution Planning. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/MPE.2016.2639179.
Coddington, Michael, Sciano, Damian, & Fuller, Jason. Change in Brooklyn and Queens: How New York?s Reforming the Energy Vision Program and Con Edison Are Reshaping Electric Distribution Planning. United States. doi:10.1109/MPE.2016.2639179.
Coddington, Michael, Sciano, Damian, and Fuller, Jason. Wed . "Change in Brooklyn and Queens: How New York?s Reforming the Energy Vision Program and Con Edison Are Reshaping Electric Distribution Planning". United States. doi:10.1109/MPE.2016.2639179.
@article{osti_1358332,
title = {Change in Brooklyn and Queens: How New York?s Reforming the Energy Vision Program and Con Edison Are Reshaping Electric Distribution Planning},
author = {Coddington, Michael and Sciano, Damian and Fuller, Jason},
abstractNote = {The New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens are undergoing a period of gentrification, infrastructure rebuilding, new construction, and load growth not experienced in decades. Significant numbers of residents are moving in, and structures that had been abandoned or were in disrepair are being refurbished and modernized to accommodate the burgeoning population. Homes, businesses, and industries are reviving areas long in decline, and Brooklyn's growth has made it the nation's fourth most populous city, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.},
doi = {10.1109/MPE.2016.2639179},
journal = {IEEE Power & Energy Magazine},
number = 2,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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