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Title: Progress In Developing An In-Pile Acoustically Telemetered Sensor Infrastructure

Abstract

A salient grand challenge for a number of Department of Energy programs such as Fuels Cycle Research and Development ( includes Accident Tolerant Fuel research and the Transient Reactor Test Facility Restart experiments), Light Water Sustainability, and Advanced Reactor Technologies is to enhance our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. Robust and accurate in-pile measurements will be instrumental to develop and validate a computationally predictive multi-scale understanding of nuclear fuel and materials. This sensing technology will enable the linking of fundamental micro-structural evolution mechanisms to the macroscopic degradation of fuels and materials. The in situ sensors and measurement systems will monitor local environmental parameters as well as characterize microstructure evolution during irradiation. One of the major road blocks in developing practical robust, and cost effective in-pile sensor systems, are instrument leads. If a wireless telemetry infrastructure can be developed for in-pile use, in-core measurements would become more attractive and effective. Thus to be successful in accomplishing effective in-pile sensing and microstructure characterization an interdisciplinary measurement infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with key sensing technology. For the discussion in this research, infrastructure is defined as systems, technology, techniques, and algorithms that may be necessary in themore » delivery of beneficial and robust data from in-pile devices. The architecture of a system’s infrastructure determines how well it operates and how flexible it is to meet future requirements. The limiting path for the effective deployment of the salient sensing technology will not be the sensors themselves but the infrastructure that is necessary to communicate data from in-pile to the outside world in a non-intrusive and reliable manner. This article gives a high level overview of a promising telemetry infrastructure based on acoustic wireless transmission of data that is being developed and tested by the INL, Penn State and Westinghouse.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1358210
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-16-37719
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Top Fuel 2016, Boise, ID, September 11–16, 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; acoustic; communication; in-pile; infrastructure; sensor; Telemetry; thermoacoustic

Citation Formats

Smith, James A., Garrett, Steven L., Heibel, Michael D., Agarwal, Vivek, and Heidrich, Brenden J. Progress In Developing An In-Pile Acoustically Telemetered Sensor Infrastructure. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Smith, James A., Garrett, Steven L., Heibel, Michael D., Agarwal, Vivek, & Heidrich, Brenden J. Progress In Developing An In-Pile Acoustically Telemetered Sensor Infrastructure. United States.
Smith, James A., Garrett, Steven L., Heibel, Michael D., Agarwal, Vivek, and Heidrich, Brenden J. 2016. "Progress In Developing An In-Pile Acoustically Telemetered Sensor Infrastructure". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1358210.
@article{osti_1358210,
title = {Progress In Developing An In-Pile Acoustically Telemetered Sensor Infrastructure},
author = {Smith, James A. and Garrett, Steven L. and Heibel, Michael D. and Agarwal, Vivek and Heidrich, Brenden J.},
abstractNote = {A salient grand challenge for a number of Department of Energy programs such as Fuels Cycle Research and Development ( includes Accident Tolerant Fuel research and the Transient Reactor Test Facility Restart experiments), Light Water Sustainability, and Advanced Reactor Technologies is to enhance our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. Robust and accurate in-pile measurements will be instrumental to develop and validate a computationally predictive multi-scale understanding of nuclear fuel and materials. This sensing technology will enable the linking of fundamental micro-structural evolution mechanisms to the macroscopic degradation of fuels and materials. The in situ sensors and measurement systems will monitor local environmental parameters as well as characterize microstructure evolution during irradiation. One of the major road blocks in developing practical robust, and cost effective in-pile sensor systems, are instrument leads. If a wireless telemetry infrastructure can be developed for in-pile use, in-core measurements would become more attractive and effective. Thus to be successful in accomplishing effective in-pile sensing and microstructure characterization an interdisciplinary measurement infrastructure needs to be developed in parallel with key sensing technology. For the discussion in this research, infrastructure is defined as systems, technology, techniques, and algorithms that may be necessary in the delivery of beneficial and robust data from in-pile devices. The architecture of a system’s infrastructure determines how well it operates and how flexible it is to meet future requirements. The limiting path for the effective deployment of the salient sensing technology will not be the sensors themselves but the infrastructure that is necessary to communicate data from in-pile to the outside world in a non-intrusive and reliable manner. This article gives a high level overview of a promising telemetry infrastructure based on acoustic wireless transmission of data that is being developed and tested by the INL, Penn State and Westinghouse.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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