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Title: Phased Development of Accident Tolerant Fue

Abstract

The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) has adopted a three-phase approach for the development and eventual commercialization of enhanced, accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for light water reactors (LWRs). Extending from 2012 to 2016, AFC is currently coming to the end of Phase 1 research that has entailed Feasibility Assessment and Prioritization for a large number of proposed fuel systems (fuel and cladding) that could provide improved performance under accident conditions. Phase 1 activities will culminate with a prioritization of concepts for both near-term and long-term development based on the available experimental data and modeling predictions. This process will provide guidance to DOE on what concepts should be prioritized for investment in Phase 2 Development/Qualification activities based on technical performance improvements and probability of meeting the aggressive schedule to insert a lead fuel rod (LFR) in a commercial power reactor by 2022. While Phase 1 activities include small-scale fabrication work, materials characterization, and limited irradiation of samples, Phase 2 will require development teams to expand to industrial fabrication methods, conduct irradiation tests under more prototypic reactor conditions (i.e. in contact with reactor primary coolant at LWR conditions and in-pile transient testing), conduct additional characterization andmore » post-irradiation examination, and develop a fuel performance code for the candidate ATF. Phase 2 will culminate in the insertion of an LFR (or lead fuel assembly) in a commercial power reactor. The Phase 3 Commercialization work will extend past 2022. Following post-irradiation examination of LFRs, partial-core reloads will be demonstrated. The commercialization phase will further entail the establishment of commercial fabrication capabilities and the transition of LWR cores to the new fuel. The three development phases described roughly correspond to the technology readiness levels (TRL) defined for nuclear fuel development. TRL 1–3 corresponds to the “proof-of-concept” stage (Phase 1), TRL 4–6 to “proof-of-principle” (Phase 2), and TRL 7–9 to “proof-of-performance” (Phase 3). This paper will provide an overview of the anticipated activities within each phase of development and will provide an update on the current ATF development status.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1358208
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-16-37710
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Top Fuel 2016, Boise, ID, September 11–16, 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; accident tolerant fuel; ATF; LWR fuel

Citation Formats

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M., and Carmack, W. Jon. Phased Development of Accident Tolerant Fue. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M., & Carmack, W. Jon. Phased Development of Accident Tolerant Fue. United States.
Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M., and Carmack, W. Jon. 2016. "Phased Development of Accident Tolerant Fue". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1358208.
@article{osti_1358208,
title = {Phased Development of Accident Tolerant Fue},
author = {Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. and Carmack, W. Jon},
abstractNote = {The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) has adopted a three-phase approach for the development and eventual commercialization of enhanced, accident tolerant fuel (ATF) for light water reactors (LWRs). Extending from 2012 to 2016, AFC is currently coming to the end of Phase 1 research that has entailed Feasibility Assessment and Prioritization for a large number of proposed fuel systems (fuel and cladding) that could provide improved performance under accident conditions. Phase 1 activities will culminate with a prioritization of concepts for both near-term and long-term development based on the available experimental data and modeling predictions. This process will provide guidance to DOE on what concepts should be prioritized for investment in Phase 2 Development/Qualification activities based on technical performance improvements and probability of meeting the aggressive schedule to insert a lead fuel rod (LFR) in a commercial power reactor by 2022. While Phase 1 activities include small-scale fabrication work, materials characterization, and limited irradiation of samples, Phase 2 will require development teams to expand to industrial fabrication methods, conduct irradiation tests under more prototypic reactor conditions (i.e. in contact with reactor primary coolant at LWR conditions and in-pile transient testing), conduct additional characterization and post-irradiation examination, and develop a fuel performance code for the candidate ATF. Phase 2 will culminate in the insertion of an LFR (or lead fuel assembly) in a commercial power reactor. The Phase 3 Commercialization work will extend past 2022. Following post-irradiation examination of LFRs, partial-core reloads will be demonstrated. The commercialization phase will further entail the establishment of commercial fabrication capabilities and the transition of LWR cores to the new fuel. The three development phases described roughly correspond to the technology readiness levels (TRL) defined for nuclear fuel development. TRL 1–3 corresponds to the “proof-of-concept” stage (Phase 1), TRL 4–6 to “proof-of-principle” (Phase 2), and TRL 7–9 to “proof-of-performance” (Phase 3). This paper will provide an overview of the anticipated activities within each phase of development and will provide an update on the current ATF development status.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Conference:
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  • The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is conducting research and development on enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) for light water reactors (LWRs). This mission emphasizes the development of novel fuel and cladding concepts to replace the current zirconium alloy-uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The overall mission of the ATF research is to develop advanced fuels/cladding with improved performance, reliability and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions, while minimizing waste generation. The initial effort will focus on implementation in operating reactors or reactors with design certifications. To initiate the developmentmore » of quantitative metrics for ATR, a LWR Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held in October 2012 in Germantown, MD. This paper summarizes the outcome of that workshop and the current status of metrics development for LWR ATF.« less
  • The United States Fuel Cycle Research and Development Advanced Fuels Campaign has been given the responsibility to conduct research and development on enhanced accident tolerant fuels with the goal of performing a lead test assembly or lead test rod irradiation in a commercial reactor by 2022. The Advanced Fuels Campaign has defined fuels with enhanced accident tolerance as those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-Zircaloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining ormore » improving the fuel performance during normal operations and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. This paper provides an overview of the FCRD Accident Tolerant Fuel program. The ATF attributes will be presented and discussed. Attributes identified as potentially important to enhance accident tolerance include reduced hydrogen generation (resulting from cladding oxidation), enhanced fission product retention under severe accident conditions, reduced cladding reaction with high-temperature steam, and improved fuel-cladding interaction for enhanced performance under extreme conditions. To demonstrate the enhanced accident tolerance of candidate fuel designs, metrics must be developed and evaluated using a combination of design features for a given LWR design, potential improvements to that design, and the design of an advanced fuel/cladding system. The aforementioned attributes provide qualitative guidance for parameters that will be considered for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. It may be unnecessary to improve in all attributes and it is likely that some attributes or combination of attributes provide meaningful gains in accident tolerance, while others may provide only marginal benefits. Thus, an initial step in program implementation will be the development of quantitative metrics. A companion paper in these proceedings provides an update on the status of establishing these quantitative metrics for accident tolerant LWR fuel.1 The United States FCRD Advanced Fuels Campaign has embarked on an aggressive schedule for development of enhanced accident tolerant LWR fuels. The goal of developing such a fuel system that can be deployed in the U.S. LWR fleet in the next 10 to 20 years supports the sustainability of clean nuclear power generation in the United States.« less
  • A variety of instruments are being developed and qualified to support the Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) program and future transient irradiations at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The University of New Mexico (UNM) is working with INL to develop capacitance-based void sensors for determining the timing of critical boiling phenomena in static capsule fuel testing and the volume-averaged void fraction in flow-boiling in-pile water loop fuel testing. The static capsule sensor developed at INL is a plate-type configuration, while UNM is utilizing a ring-type capacitance sensor. Each sensor design has been theoretically and experimentallymore » investigated at INL and UNM. Experiments are being performed at INL in an autoclave to investigate the performance of these sensors under representative Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) conditions in a static capsule. Experiments have been performed at UNM using air-water two-phase flow to determine the sensitivity and time response of the capacitance sensor under a flow boiling configuration. Initial measurements from the capacitance sensor have demonstrated the validity of the concept to enable real-time measurement of void fraction. The next steps include designing the cabling interface with the flow loop at UNM for Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) ATF testing at TREAT and further characterization of the measurement response for each sensor under varying conditions by experiments and modeling.« less