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Title: Cost and Systems Analysis of Innovative Fuel Resources Concepts

Abstract

Economically recovered uranium from seawater can have a transformative effect on the way policy makers view the long-term viability of uranium based fuel cycles. Seawater uranium, even when estimated to cost more than terrestrially mined uranium, is integral in establishing an economic backstop, thus reducing uncertainty in future nuclear power costs. While a passive recovery scheme relying on a field of polymer adsorbents prepared via radiation induced grafting has long been considered the leading technology for full scale deployment, non-trivial cost and logistical barriers persist. Consequently, university partners of the nation-wide consortium for seawater uranium recovery have developed variants of this technology, each aiming to address a substantial weakness. The focus of this NEUP project is the economic impacts of the proposed variant technologies. The team at University of Alabama has pursued an adsorbent synthesis method that replaces the synthetic fiber backbone with a natural waste product. Chitin fibers suitable for ligand grafting have been prepared from shrimp shell waste. These environmental benefits could be realized at a comparable cost to the reference fiber so long as the uptake can be increased or the chemical consumption cost decreased.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Nuclear and Radiation Engineering Program
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1358192
Report Number(s):
13-5484
13-5484
DOE Contract Number:
NE0000745
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Schneider, Erich, and Byers, M. Cost and Systems Analysis of Innovative Fuel Resources Concepts. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1358192.
Schneider, Erich, & Byers, M. Cost and Systems Analysis of Innovative Fuel Resources Concepts. United States. doi:10.2172/1358192.
Schneider, Erich, and Byers, M. Thu . "Cost and Systems Analysis of Innovative Fuel Resources Concepts". United States. doi:10.2172/1358192. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1358192.
@article{osti_1358192,
title = {Cost and Systems Analysis of Innovative Fuel Resources Concepts},
author = {Schneider, Erich and Byers, M.},
abstractNote = {Economically recovered uranium from seawater can have a transformative effect on the way policy makers view the long-term viability of uranium based fuel cycles. Seawater uranium, even when estimated to cost more than terrestrially mined uranium, is integral in establishing an economic backstop, thus reducing uncertainty in future nuclear power costs. While a passive recovery scheme relying on a field of polymer adsorbents prepared via radiation induced grafting has long been considered the leading technology for full scale deployment, non-trivial cost and logistical barriers persist. Consequently, university partners of the nation-wide consortium for seawater uranium recovery have developed variants of this technology, each aiming to address a substantial weakness. The focus of this NEUP project is the economic impacts of the proposed variant technologies. The team at University of Alabama has pursued an adsorbent synthesis method that replaces the synthetic fiber backbone with a natural waste product. Chitin fibers suitable for ligand grafting have been prepared from shrimp shell waste. These environmental benefits could be realized at a comparable cost to the reference fiber so long as the uptake can be increased or the chemical consumption cost decreased.},
doi = {10.2172/1358192},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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