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Title: Study of Viability and Challenges of using SiPMs as an Alternative to PMT’s in Scintillation Detectors for Nuclear Safeguards

Abstract

The goals of this project are to identify fundamental and practical problems and features with SiPMs as they relate to IAEA detector needs, Identify published results and implementations of scintillation detectors tat use SiPMs that are of interest to IAEA, asses how effectively the fundamental problems were addresses, and perform simulations and experiments as needed to reproduce crucial results and make recommendations.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1358175
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24154
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; photo detector; silicon photo multiplier; radiation detector; nuclear safeguards

Citation Formats

Iliev, Metodi. Study of Viability and Challenges of using SiPMs as an Alternative to PMT’s in Scintillation Detectors for Nuclear Safeguards. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1358175.
Iliev, Metodi. Study of Viability and Challenges of using SiPMs as an Alternative to PMT’s in Scintillation Detectors for Nuclear Safeguards. United States. doi:10.2172/1358175.
Iliev, Metodi. 2017. "Study of Viability and Challenges of using SiPMs as an Alternative to PMT’s in Scintillation Detectors for Nuclear Safeguards". United States. doi:10.2172/1358175. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1358175.
@article{osti_1358175,
title = {Study of Viability and Challenges of using SiPMs as an Alternative to PMT’s in Scintillation Detectors for Nuclear Safeguards},
author = {Iliev, Metodi},
abstractNote = {The goals of this project are to identify fundamental and practical problems and features with SiPMs as they relate to IAEA detector needs, Identify published results and implementations of scintillation detectors tat use SiPMs that are of interest to IAEA, asses how effectively the fundamental problems were addresses, and perform simulations and experiments as needed to reproduce crucial results and make recommendations.},
doi = {10.2172/1358175},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Technical Report:

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