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Title: Final report for SERDP WP-2209 Replacement melt-castable formulations for Composition B

Abstract

During this project we investigated a number of energetic materials both old and new and determined that most of them were unsuitable due to safety or sensitivity reasons. Unsuccessful coformulants include TNAZ and BNFF for volatility reasons, and DAAF due to thermal compatibility issues. The powerful explosive HMX became a focus of the work in later stages as it conferred excellent power while being commonly available in well-regulated particle size lots and is chemically compatible in the melt with many coformulants. Ultimately three preferred formulations emerged from this work: a formulation tested on large scale by ARDEC involving PrNQ and HMX; a formulation tested at ARDEC and LANL using a nitrate salt eutectic and HMX; a formulation tested at LANL using LLM-201 and HMX.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1358157
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-24143
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; Explosive

Citation Formats

Leonard, Philip, and Francois, Elizabeth Green. Final report for SERDP WP-2209 Replacement melt-castable formulations for Composition B. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1358157.
Leonard, Philip, & Francois, Elizabeth Green. Final report for SERDP WP-2209 Replacement melt-castable formulations for Composition B. United States. doi:10.2172/1358157.
Leonard, Philip, and Francois, Elizabeth Green. Fri . "Final report for SERDP WP-2209 Replacement melt-castable formulations for Composition B". United States. doi:10.2172/1358157. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1358157.
@article{osti_1358157,
title = {Final report for SERDP WP-2209 Replacement melt-castable formulations for Composition B},
author = {Leonard, Philip and Francois, Elizabeth Green},
abstractNote = {During this project we investigated a number of energetic materials both old and new and determined that most of them were unsuitable due to safety or sensitivity reasons. Unsuccessful coformulants include TNAZ and BNFF for volatility reasons, and DAAF due to thermal compatibility issues. The powerful explosive HMX became a focus of the work in later stages as it conferred excellent power while being commonly available in well-regulated particle size lots and is chemically compatible in the melt with many coformulants. Ultimately three preferred formulations emerged from this work: a formulation tested on large scale by ARDEC involving PrNQ and HMX; a formulation tested at ARDEC and LANL using a nitrate salt eutectic and HMX; a formulation tested at LANL using LLM-201 and HMX.},
doi = {10.2172/1358157},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 19 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri May 19 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This report describes the results of testing specified by the Test Plan VSL-06R6900-1 Rev 0. The work was performed in compliance with quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The test results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.
  • Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area scanning is a multi-level one, in which medium altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry followed by surface investigations using either towed geophysicalmore » sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be effective for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 – 3 meters. These altitude requirements means that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus, other systems are needed allowing for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it would be safer for the operators, cheaper in initial and O&M costs, and more effective in terms of site characterization. However, while UAV data acquisition from fixed wing platforms for large (> 200 feet) stand off distances is relatively straight forward, a host of challenges exist for low stand-off distance (~ 6 feet) UAV geophysical data acquisition. The objective of SERDP SEED 1509:2006 was to identify the primary challenges associated with a low stand off distance autonomous UAV magnetometer platform and to investigate whether these challenges can be resolved successfully such that a successful UAV magnetometer platform can be constructed. The primary challenges which were identified and investigated include: 1. The feasibility of assembling a payload package which integrates magnetometers, accurate positioning systems (DGPS, height above ground measurement), obstacle avoidance systems, power infrastructure, communications and data storage as well as auxiliary flight controls 2. The availability of commercial UAV platforms with autonomous flight capability which can accommodate this payload package 3. The feasibility of integrating obstacle avoidance controls in UAV platform control 4. The feasibility of collecting high quality magnetic data in the vicinity of an UAV.« less
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