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Title: Using augmented reality to inform consumer choice and lower carbon footprints

Abstract

Consumers who wish to consider product attributes like carbon footprints in their purchasing decisions are often blocked from meaningful action by a lack of information. We conducted a single randomized controlled trial at a grocery store to evaluate the effects of providing such product attribute and carbon footprint information via augmented reality (AR) displays on bottled water and breakfast cereal, two frequently purchased goods. Using an AR smartphone app that incorporates comparative and detailed product information into personalized data and recommendations, a 23% statistically significant reduction in carbon footprint was found for bottled water, and non-significant reductions for breakfast cereal. Furthermore, AR informed choice lead to healthier cereal choices.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), NREL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD); USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1358125
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1360892
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-6A80-65565
Journal ID: ISSN 1748-9326
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1748-9326
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; augmented reality; human subjects; behavioral science; carbon footprint; consumer behavior; nutrition

Citation Formats

Isley, Steven C., Ketcham, Robert, and Arent, Douglas J. Using augmented reality to inform consumer choice and lower carbon footprints. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa6def.
Isley, Steven C., Ketcham, Robert, & Arent, Douglas J. Using augmented reality to inform consumer choice and lower carbon footprints. United States. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa6def.
Isley, Steven C., Ketcham, Robert, and Arent, Douglas J. Tue . "Using augmented reality to inform consumer choice and lower carbon footprints". United States. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa6def.
@article{osti_1358125,
title = {Using augmented reality to inform consumer choice and lower carbon footprints},
author = {Isley, Steven C. and Ketcham, Robert and Arent, Douglas J.},
abstractNote = {Consumers who wish to consider product attributes like carbon footprints in their purchasing decisions are often blocked from meaningful action by a lack of information. We conducted a single randomized controlled trial at a grocery store to evaluate the effects of providing such product attribute and carbon footprint information via augmented reality (AR) displays on bottled water and breakfast cereal, two frequently purchased goods. Using an AR smartphone app that incorporates comparative and detailed product information into personalized data and recommendations, a 23% statistically significant reduction in carbon footprint was found for bottled water, and non-significant reductions for breakfast cereal. Furthermore, AR informed choice lead to healthier cereal choices.},
doi = {10.1088/1748-9326/aa6def},
journal = {Environmental Research Letters},
number = 6,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue May 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1088/1748-9326/aa6def

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  • Consumers who wish to consider product attributes like carbon footprints in their purchasing decisions are often blocked from meaningful action by a lack of information. We conducted a single randomized controlled trial at a grocery store to evaluate the effects of providing such product attribute and carbon footprint information via augmented reality (AR) displays on bottled water and breakfast cereal, two frequently purchased goods. Using an AR smartphone app that incorporates comparative and detailed product information into personalized data and recommendations, a 23% statistically significant reduction in carbon footprint was found for bottled water, and non-significant reductions for breakfast cereal.more » Furthermore, AR informed choice lead to healthier cereal choices.« less
  • A major barrier to transitions to environmental sustainability is that consumers lack information about the full environmental footprints of their purchases. Sellers' incentives do not support reducing the footprints unless customers have such information and are willing to act on it. We explore the potential of modern information technology to lower this barrier by enabling firms to inform customers of products' environmental footprints at the point of purchase and easily offset consumers' contributions through bundled purchases of carbon offsets. Using online stated choice experiments, we evaluated the effectiveness of several inexpensive features that firms in four industries could implement withmore » existing online user interfaces for consumers. These examples illustrate the potential for firms to lower their overall carbon footprints while improving customer satisfaction by lowering the 'soft costs' to consumers of pro-environmental choices. Lastly, opportunities such as these likely exist wherever firms possess environmentally relevant data not accessible to consumers or when transaction costs make pro-environmental action difficult.« less
    Cited by 1
  • A major barrier to transitions to environmental sustainability is that consumers lack information about the full environmental footprints of their purchases. Sellers' incentives do not support reducing the footprints unless customers have such information and are willing to act on it. We explore the potential of modern information technology to lower this barrier by enabling firms to inform customers of products' environmental footprints at the point of purchase and easily offset consumers' contributions through bundled purchases of carbon offsets. Using online stated choice experiments, we evaluated the effectiveness of several inexpensive features that firms in four industries could implement withmore » existing online user interfaces for consumers. These examples illustrate the potential for firms to lower their overall carbon footprints while improving customer satisfaction by lowering the 'soft costs' to consumers of pro-environmental choices. Lastly, opportunities such as these likely exist wherever firms possess environmentally relevant data not accessible to consumers or when transaction costs make pro-environmental action difficult.« less
  • From stereophonic, positional sound to high-definition imagery that is crisp and clean, high fidelity computer graphics enhance our view, insight, and intuition regarding our environments and conditions. Contemporary 3-D modeling tools offer an open architecture framework that enables integration with other technologically innovative arenas. One innovation of great interest is Augmented Reality, the merging of virtual, digital environments with physical, real-world environments creating a mixed reality where relevant data and information augments the real or actual experience in real-time by spatial or semantic context. Pairing 3-D virtual immersive models with a dynamic platform such as semi-autonomous robotics or personnel odometrymore » systems to create a mixed reality offers a new and innovative design information verification inspection capability, evaluation accuracy, and information gathering capability for nuclear facilities. Our paper discusses the integration of two innovative technologies, 3-D visualizations with inertial positioning systems, and the resulting augmented reality offered to the human inspector. The discussion in the paper includes an exploration of human and non-human (surrogate) inspections of a nuclear facility, integrated safeguards knowledge within a synchronized virtual model operated, or worn, by a human inspector, and the anticipated benefits to safeguards evaluations of facility operations.« less
  • Purpose: The aim of this study is to implement augmented reality in real-time image-guided interstitial brachytherapy to allow an intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation. Methods and Materials: The developed system consists of a common video projector, two high-resolution charge coupled device cameras, and an off-the-shelf notebook. The projector was used as a scanning device by projecting coded-light patterns to register the patient and superimpose the operating field with planning data and additional information in arbitrary colors. Subsequent movements of the nonfixed patient were detected by means of stereoscopically tracking passive markers attached to the patient. Results: In a first clinical study,more » we evaluated the whole process chain from image acquisition to data projection and determined overall accuracy with 10 patients undergoing implantation. The described method enabled the surgeon to visualize planning data on top of any preoperatively segmented and triangulated surface (skin) with direct line of sight during the operation. Furthermore, the tracking system allowed dynamic adjustment of the data to the patient's current position and therefore eliminated the need for rigid fixation. Because of soft-part displacement, we obtained an average deviation of 1.1 mm by moving the patient, whereas changing the projector's position resulted in an average deviation of 0.9 mm. Mean deviation of all needles of an implant was 1.4 mm (range, 0.3-2.7 mm). Conclusions: The developed low-cost augmented-reality system proved to be accurate and feasible in interstitial brachytherapy. The system meets clinical demands and enables intuitive real-time intraoperative orientation and monitoring of needle implantation.« less