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Title: The Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership (ATP 3 ) framework; establishment of a national network of testbed sites to support sustainable algae production

Abstract

Well-controlled experiments that directly compare seasonal algal productivities across geographically distinct locations have not been reported before. To fill this gap, six cultivation testbed facilities were chosen across the United States to evaluate different climatic zones with respect to algal biomass productivity potential. The geographical locations and climates were as follows: Southwest, desert; Western, coastal; Southeast, inland; Southeast, coastal; Pacific, tropical; and Midwest, greenhouse. The testbed facilities were equipped with identical systems for inoculum production and open pond operation and methods were standardized across all testbeds to ensure accurate measurement of physical and biological variables. The ability of the testbed sites to culture and analyze the same algal species, Nannochloropsis oceanica KA32, using identical pond operational and data collection procedures was evaluated during the same seasonal timeframe. This manuscript describes the results of a first-of-its-kind coordinated testbed validation field study while providing critical details on how geographical variations in temperature, light, and weather variables influenced algal productivity, nitrate consumption, and biomass composition. We found distinct differences in growth characteristics due to the geographic location and the resulting climatic and seasonal conditions across the sites, with the highest productivities observed at the desert Southwest and tropical Pacific regions, followed by themore » Western coastal region. The lowest productivities were observed at the Southeast inland and Midwest greenhouse locations. These differences in productivities among the sites correlated with the differences in pond water temperature and available solar radiation. In addition two sites, the tropical Pacific and Southeast inland experienced unusual events, spontaneous flocculation, and unusually cold and wet (rainfall) conditions respectively, that negatively affected outdoor algal growth. In addition, minor variability in productivity was observed between the different experimental treatments at each site, much smaller compared to differences due to geographic location. Finally, the successful demonstration of the coordinated and standardized operation of the testbed sites established a rigorous basis for future validation of algal strains and operational conditions and protocols across a geographically diverse testbed network.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)
  2. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  3. Harmon Consulting Inc., Kamuela, HI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1358120
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1365696
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5100-68726
Journal ID: ISSN 2211-9264
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308; EE0005996
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Algal Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 2211-9264
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; algae; biomass; lipids; carbohydrates; geographic variability; standardization

Citation Formats

McGowen, John, Knoshaug, Eric P., Laurens, Lieve M. L., Dempster, Thomas A., Pienkos, Philip T., Wolfrum, Ed, and Harmon, Valerie L.. The Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership (ATP 3 ) framework; establishment of a national network of testbed sites to support sustainable algae production. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2017.05.017.
McGowen, John, Knoshaug, Eric P., Laurens, Lieve M. L., Dempster, Thomas A., Pienkos, Philip T., Wolfrum, Ed, & Harmon, Valerie L.. The Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership (ATP 3 ) framework; establishment of a national network of testbed sites to support sustainable algae production. United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2017.05.017.
McGowen, John, Knoshaug, Eric P., Laurens, Lieve M. L., Dempster, Thomas A., Pienkos, Philip T., Wolfrum, Ed, and Harmon, Valerie L.. Sat . "The Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership (ATP 3 ) framework; establishment of a national network of testbed sites to support sustainable algae production". United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2017.05.017.
@article{osti_1358120,
title = {The Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership (ATP 3 ) framework; establishment of a national network of testbed sites to support sustainable algae production},
author = {McGowen, John and Knoshaug, Eric P. and Laurens, Lieve M. L. and Dempster, Thomas A. and Pienkos, Philip T. and Wolfrum, Ed and Harmon, Valerie L.},
abstractNote = {Well-controlled experiments that directly compare seasonal algal productivities across geographically distinct locations have not been reported before. To fill this gap, six cultivation testbed facilities were chosen across the United States to evaluate different climatic zones with respect to algal biomass productivity potential. The geographical locations and climates were as follows: Southwest, desert; Western, coastal; Southeast, inland; Southeast, coastal; Pacific, tropical; and Midwest, greenhouse. The testbed facilities were equipped with identical systems for inoculum production and open pond operation and methods were standardized across all testbeds to ensure accurate measurement of physical and biological variables. The ability of the testbed sites to culture and analyze the same algal species, Nannochloropsis oceanica KA32, using identical pond operational and data collection procedures was evaluated during the same seasonal timeframe. This manuscript describes the results of a first-of-its-kind coordinated testbed validation field study while providing critical details on how geographical variations in temperature, light, and weather variables influenced algal productivity, nitrate consumption, and biomass composition. We found distinct differences in growth characteristics due to the geographic location and the resulting climatic and seasonal conditions across the sites, with the highest productivities observed at the desert Southwest and tropical Pacific regions, followed by the Western coastal region. The lowest productivities were observed at the Southeast inland and Midwest greenhouse locations. These differences in productivities among the sites correlated with the differences in pond water temperature and available solar radiation. In addition two sites, the tropical Pacific and Southeast inland experienced unusual events, spontaneous flocculation, and unusually cold and wet (rainfall) conditions respectively, that negatively affected outdoor algal growth. In addition, minor variability in productivity was observed between the different experimental treatments at each site, much smaller compared to differences due to geographic location. Finally, the successful demonstration of the coordinated and standardized operation of the testbed sites established a rigorous basis for future validation of algal strains and operational conditions and protocols across a geographically diverse testbed network.},
doi = {10.1016/j.algal.2017.05.017},
journal = {Algal Research},
number = C,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.algal.2017.05.017

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  • Well-controlled experiments that directly compare seasonal algal productivities across geographically distinct locations have not been reported before. To fill this gap, six cultivation testbed facilities were chosen across the United States to evaluate different climatic zones with respect to algal biomass productivity potential. The geographical locations and climates were as follows: Southwest, desert; Western, coastal; Southeast, inland; Southeast, coastal; Pacific, tropical; and Midwest, greenhouse. The testbed facilities were equipped with identical systems for inoculum production and open pond operation and methods were standardized across all testbeds to ensure accurate measurement of physical and biological variables. The ability of the testbedmore » sites to culture and analyze the same algal species, Nannochloropsis oceanica KA32, using identical pond operational and data collection procedures was evaluated during the same seasonal timeframe. This manuscript describes the results of a first-of-its-kind coordinated testbed validation field study while providing critical details on how geographical variations in temperature, light, and weather variables influenced algal productivity, nitrate consumption, and biomass composition. We found distinct differences in growth characteristics due to the geographic location and the resulting climatic and seasonal conditions across the sites, with the highest productivities observed at the desert Southwest and tropical Pacific regions, followed by the Western coastal region. The lowest productivities were observed at the Southeast inland and Midwest greenhouse locations. These differences in productivities among the sites correlated with the differences in pond water temperature and available solar radiation. In addition two sites, the tropical Pacific and Southeast inland experienced unusual events, spontaneous flocculation, and unusually cold and wet (rainfall) conditions respectively, that negatively affected outdoor algal growth. In addition, minor variability in productivity was observed between the different experimental treatments at each site, much smaller compared to differences due to geographic location. Finally, the successful demonstration of the coordinated and standardized operation of the testbed sites established a rigorous basis for future validation of algal strains and operational conditions and protocols across a geographically diverse testbed network.« less
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