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Title: In situ Visualization of State-of-Charge Heterogeneity within a LiCoO 2 Particle that Evolves upon Cycling at Different Rates

Abstract

For designing new battery systems with higher energy density and longer cycle life, it is important to understand the degradation mechanism of the electrode material, especially at the individual particle level. Using in situ transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) coupled to a pouch cell setup, the inhomogeneous Li distribution as well as the formation, population, and evolution of inactive domains in a single LiCoO 2 particle were visualized in this paper as it was cycled for many times. It is found that the percentage of the particle that fully recovered to the pristine state is strongly related to the cycling rate. Interestingly, we also observed the evolution of the inactive region within the particle during long-term cycling. The relationship between morphological degradation and chemical inhomogeneity, including the formation of unanticipated Co metal phase, is also observed. Finally, our work highlights the capability of in situ TXM for studying the degradation mechanism of materials in LIBs.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [5]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [2]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Donghua Univ., Shanghai (China). College of Mechanical Engineering; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Division
  3. Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics. Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility
  4. Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of Physics. Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics
  5. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource
  6. Donghua Univ., Shanghai (China). College of Mechanical Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); Ministry of Science and Technology of China; National Key Research and Development Program of China; National Natural Science Foundation of China (NNSFC); Open Research Foundation of State Key Lab. of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology (China)
Contributing Org.:
Donghua Univ., Shanghai (China)
OSTI Identifier:
1358026
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1368569
Report Number(s):
BNL-113846-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 2380-8195; R&D Project: MA453MAEA
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704; AC02-76SF00515; 2016YFB0100300; 2016YFA0400900; 11535015; U1632110; Battery500 consortium
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Energy Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 2380-8195
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; Ni-rich layered oxide cathode; capacity fade; phase evolution; redox reaction; surface characteristics; Li-ion batteries; National Synchrotron Light Source II

Citation Formats

Xu, Yahong, Hu, Enyuan, Zhang, Kai, Wang, Xuelong, Borzenets, Valery, Sun, Zhihong, Pianetta, Piero, Yu, Xiqian, Liu, Yijin, Yang, Xiao-Qing, and Li, Hong. In situ Visualization of State-of-Charge Heterogeneity within a LiCoO2 Particle that Evolves upon Cycling at Different Rates. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.7b00263.
Xu, Yahong, Hu, Enyuan, Zhang, Kai, Wang, Xuelong, Borzenets, Valery, Sun, Zhihong, Pianetta, Piero, Yu, Xiqian, Liu, Yijin, Yang, Xiao-Qing, & Li, Hong. In situ Visualization of State-of-Charge Heterogeneity within a LiCoO2 Particle that Evolves upon Cycling at Different Rates. United States. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.7b00263.
Xu, Yahong, Hu, Enyuan, Zhang, Kai, Wang, Xuelong, Borzenets, Valery, Sun, Zhihong, Pianetta, Piero, Yu, Xiqian, Liu, Yijin, Yang, Xiao-Qing, and Li, Hong. Fri . "In situ Visualization of State-of-Charge Heterogeneity within a LiCoO2 Particle that Evolves upon Cycling at Different Rates". United States. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.7b00263. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1358026.
@article{osti_1358026,
title = {In situ Visualization of State-of-Charge Heterogeneity within a LiCoO2 Particle that Evolves upon Cycling at Different Rates},
author = {Xu, Yahong and Hu, Enyuan and Zhang, Kai and Wang, Xuelong and Borzenets, Valery and Sun, Zhihong and Pianetta, Piero and Yu, Xiqian and Liu, Yijin and Yang, Xiao-Qing and Li, Hong},
abstractNote = {For designing new battery systems with higher energy density and longer cycle life, it is important to understand the degradation mechanism of the electrode material, especially at the individual particle level. Using in situ transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) coupled to a pouch cell setup, the inhomogeneous Li distribution as well as the formation, population, and evolution of inactive domains in a single LiCoO2 particle were visualized in this paper as it was cycled for many times. It is found that the percentage of the particle that fully recovered to the pristine state is strongly related to the cycling rate. Interestingly, we also observed the evolution of the inactive region within the particle during long-term cycling. The relationship between morphological degradation and chemical inhomogeneity, including the formation of unanticipated Co metal phase, is also observed. Finally, our work highlights the capability of in situ TXM for studying the degradation mechanism of materials in LIBs.},
doi = {10.1021/acsenergylett.7b00263},
journal = {ACS Energy Letters},
number = 5,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri May 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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